From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence. Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Konstantinos Boulouchos: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Name Prof. Dr. Konstantinos Boulouchos
FieldAerothermochemie und Verbrennungssysteme
Address
Institut für Energietechnik (eh.)
ETH Zürich, ML J 39
Sonneggstrasse 3
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 56 48
E-mailboulouchos@lav.mavt.ethz.ch
DepartmentMechanical and Process Engineering
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
151-0052-00LThermodynamics II4 credits2V + 2UK. Boulouchos, D. Poulikakos
AbstractIntroduction to thermodynamics of reactive systems and to the fundamentals of heat transfer.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the theory and to the fundamentals of the technical thermodynamics. Main focus: Chemical thermodynamics and heat transfer
Content1st and 2nd law of thermodynamics for chemically reactive systems, chemical exergy, fuel cells and kinetic gas theory.
General mechanisms of heat transfer. Introduction to heat conductivity. Stationary 1-D and 2-D heat conduction. Instationary conduction. Convection. Forced convection - flow around and through bodies. Natural convection. Evaporation (boiling) and condensation. Heat radiation. Combined heat transfer.
Lecture notesSlides and lecture notes in German.
LiteratureF.P. Incropera, D.P. DeWitt, T.L. Bergman, and A.S. Lavine, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, John Wiley & Sons, 6th edition, 2006.

M.J. Moran, H.N. Shapiro, Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, John Wiley & Sons, 2007.
151-0226-00LEnergy and Transport Futures4 credits3GK. Boulouchos, P. J. de Haan van der Weg, G. Georges
AbstractThe course teaches to view local energy solutions as part of the larger energy system. Because it powers all sectors, local changes can have consequences reaching well beyond one sector. While we explore all sectors, we put a particular emphasis on mobility and its unique challenges. We not only cover engineering aspects, but also policymaking and behavioral economics.
ObjectiveThe main objectives of this lecture are:
(i) Systemic view on the Energy Sytem with emphasis on Transport Applications
(ii) Students can assess the reduction of energy demand (or greenhouse gas emissions) of sectoral solutions.
(iii) Students understand the advantages and disadvantages of technology options in mobility
(iv) Students know policy tools to affect change in mobility, and understand the rebound effect.
ContentThe course describes the role of energy system plays for the well-being of modern societies, and drafts a future energy system based on renewable energy sources, able to meet the demands of the sectors building, industry and transport. The projected Swiss energy system is used as an example. Students learn how all sectoral solutions feedback on the whole system and how sector coupling could lead to optimal transformation paths. The course then focuses on the history, status quo and technical potentials of the transport sector. Policy mixes to reduce energy demand and CO2 emissions from transport are introduced. Both direct and indirect effects of different policy types are discussed. Concepts from behavioral economics (car purchase behavior and rebound effects) are presented.

Preliminary schedule:
Block 1. Energy technologies and policies.
Climate, Environment, Security of Supply.Technology options and policies in power generation, building and industrial sectors .
Block 2. Transport technologies.
Technology options in mobility and their physical aspects
Block 3. Transport policies
Regulation, policy tools and technological potential to affect change in mobility
Block 4. Energy and Transport Futures
Closing loop across all sectors. Sector-coupling.
Lecture notest.b.d.
Literaturet.b.d.
151-0254-00LEnvironmental Aspects of IC-Engines4 credits2V + 1UK. Boulouchos, C. Barro, P. Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Y. M. Wright
AbstractTurbulent flowfield in IC engines. Ignition, premixed flame propagation, knock in homogeneous charge, external ignition engines (otto). Compression-ignition diesel engines, incl. mixture formation and HCCI concepts. Direct ignition. Pollutant formation mechanism (NOx, particulates, unburned hydrocarbons) and their minimization. Catalytic exhaust aftertreatment methods for all pollutant categories.
ObjectiveThe students get a further insight in the internal combustion engine by means of the topics mentioned in the abstract. This knowledge is applied in several calculation exercises and lab exercises at the engine test bench. The students additionally get an introduction in exhaust gas aftertreatment systems.
Lecture notesHandouts are in German and English.
LiteratureJ.B. Heywood, Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals, McGraw-Hill Mechanical Engineering
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is a natural extension of the course 'IC-Engines and Propulsion Systems I' (151-0251-00L). The content of that lecture is assumed known.
Basic knowledge of thermodynamics and combustion is required.
It is beneficial to have attended the course 'Combustion and Reactive Processes in Energy and Materials Technology' (151-0293-00L).
151-1053-00LThermo- and Fluid Dynamics0 credits2KP. Jenny, R. S. Abhari, K. Boulouchos, G. Haller, C. Müller, N. Noiray, D. Poulikakos, H.‑M. Prasser, T. Rösgen, A. Steinfeld
AbstractCurrent advanced research activities in the areas of thermo- and fluid dynamics are presented and discussed, mostly by external speakers.

The talks are public and open also for interested students.
ObjectiveKnowledge of advanced research in the areas of thermo- and fluid dynamics
ContentCurrent advanced research activities in the areas of thermo- and fluid dynamics are presented and discussed, mostly by external speakers.