Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Thomas Bernauer: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Name Prof. Dr. Thomas Bernauer
FieldInternationale Beziehungen
Address
CIS
ETH Zürich, IFW C 45.1
Haldeneggsteig 4
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 67 71
E-mailthbe0520@ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
857-0004-00LPolitical Economy Restricted registration - show details
Only for MA Comparative and International Studies.
8 credits3ST. Bernauer, V. Koubi
AbstractThis seminar focuses on the interplay of political and economic factors in shaping policy outcomes at local to global levels. It concentrates on the application of economic logic to political questions and the influence of political processes and institutions on economic activity.
ObjectiveThis seminar focuses on the interplay of political and economic factors in shaping policy outcomes at local to global levels. It concentrates on the application of economic logic to political questions and the influence of political processes and institutions on economic activity.
ContentThis seminar focuses on the interplay of political and economic factors in shaping policy outcomes at local to global levels. It focuses on the application of economic logic to political questions and the influence of political processes and institutions on economic activity. It draws on a broad range of theoretical perspectives from comparative and international politics, positive political theory, public choice, and economics. We first review basic theoretical models from political science and economics and then use them to investigate a number of specific areas of interest. We examine the effects of special interests on government regulation of economic activity, the determinants of the size of government, economic growth and sustainable development, the politics of international trade and investment, and monetary and fiscal policy. We seek to make students familiar not only with the theoretical and methodological approaches used in this area of study, but also with important research issues in comparative and international political economy.
Lecture notessee http://www.cis.ethz.ch/education/macis/courses
Prerequisites / NoticeCore course in the MA CIS program. Restricted to students of MA CIS. 8 ECTS credit points upon successful completion. The overall grade will be based on a review essay, a written mid-term exam, and a written end-of-semester exam.
860-0001-00LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.

Priority for MSc Science, Technology, and Policy.
3 credits2.8GT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractStudents acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard.
ObjectivePublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
Lecture notesReading materials will be distributed electronically to the students when the semester starts.
LiteratureBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a Master level course. The course is capped at 25 students, with ISTP Master students having priority.
860-0001-01LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes; Research Paper Restricted registration - show details
Only for MSc Science, Technology, and Policy.

Prerequisite: you have to be enrolled in 860-0001-00L during the same semester.
3 credits3AT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThis is an add-on module to the course: 860-0001-00L. It focuses on students writing an essay on an issue covered by the main course 860-0001-00L.
ObjectiveStudents learn how to write an essay on a policy issue they select.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies - hence this course is complementary to the ISTP course on concepts and methods of policy analysis. Students learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (taught by Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (taught by Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (taught by Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organizations.
Lecture notesSee 860-0001-00L
LiteratureBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bernauer, T., Jahn, D., Kuhn, P., Walter, S. (2009, 2012): Einführung in die Politikwissenschaft (Introduction to Political Science). Baden-Baden: Nomos / UTB.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer, available as an ebook at ETH library.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Prerequisites / NoticeAccess only for ISTP MSc students also enrolled in 860-0001-00L
860-0005-01LColloquium Science, Technology, and Policy (FS) Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.
1 credit2KT. Bernauer, T. Schmidt
AbstractPresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
ObjectivePresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
ContentSee program on the ISTP website: http://www.istp.ethz.ch/events/colloquium.html
860-0012-00LCooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.
STP students have priority.

This is a research seminar at the Master level. PhD students are also welcome.
3 credits2SB. Wehrli, T. Bernauer, T. U. Siegfried
AbstractThis seminar focuses on the technical, economic, and political challenges of dealing with water allocation and pollution problems in large international river systems. It examines ways and means through which such challenges are addressed, and when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.
ObjectiveAbility to (1) understand the causes and consequences of water scarcity and water pollution problems in large international river systems; (2) understand ways and means of addressing such water challenges; and (3) analyse when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.
ContentBased on lectures and discussion of scientific papers and reports, students acquire basic knowledge on contentious issues in managing international water resources, on the determinants of cooperation and conflict over international water issues, and on ways and means of mitigating conflict and promoting cooperation. Students will then, in small teams coached by the instructors, carry out research on a case of their choice (i.e. an international river basin where riparian countries are trying to find solutions to water allocation and/or water quality problems associated with a large dam project). They will write a brief paper and present their findings towards the end of the semester.
Lecture notesSlides and reading materials will be distributed electronically.
LiteratureThe UN World Water Development Reports provide a broad overview of the topic: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/natural-sciences/environment/water/wwap/
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is open to Master and PhD students from any area of ETH.

ISTP students who take this course should also register for the course 860-0012-01L - Cooperation and conflict over international water resources; In-depth case study.
860-0012-01LCooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources, In-Depth Case Study Restricted registration - show details
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc and PhD students

Prerequisite: you have to be enrolled in 860-0012-00L during the same semester.
3 credits2AB. Wehrli, T. Bernauer
AbstractStudents write an individual term paper on technical, economic, and political water challenges in an international context. Coached by one of the instructors, students develop and write a case study that examines ways and means to address a specific challenge, and to evaluate success or failure of international collaboration.
ObjectiveIn developing their individual term paper, the students broaden their overview of (1) causes and consequences of water scarcity and water pollution problems in an international context; (2) they assess concepts and policies to mitigate a specific water challenge, and (3) they analyze determinants of success or failure of international collaboration in the water sectors.
ContentIn the basic course on Cooperation and Conflict... 860-0012-00L the students students acquire basic knowledge on contentious issues in managing international water resources, on the determinants of cooperation and conflict over international water issues, and on ways and means of mitigating conflict and promoting cooperation.
In this course, which is reserved to STP students, the participants will be individually coached by one of the instructors and do research and develop a case-study paper on an international water challenge of their choice. The topic should avoid overlap with the work in course 860-0012-00L.
Lecture notessee 860-0012-00L
LiteratureIn a global context, the targets of sustainable development goal 6 serve as a possible starting point: http://bit.ly/2yVARMG

In the European context, the implementation reports of the Water Framework Directive represent another reference frame: http://bit.ly/2y5NPLl
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is reserved for STP students who participate in the basic course on Cooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources 860-0012-00L.

STP students should sign up for both courses, 860-0012-00L and 860-0012-01L.