From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Marco Mazzotti: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Name Prof. Dr. Marco Mazzotti
FieldVerfahrenstechnik
Address
Inst. f. Energie-u.Verfahrenstech.
ETH Zürich, ML G 27
Sonneggstrasse 3
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Award: The Golden Owl
Telephone+41 44 632 24 56
Fax+41 44 632 11 41
E-mailmarco.mazzotti@ipe.mavt.ethz.ch
DepartmentMechanical and Process Engineering
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
151-0926-00LSeparation Process Technology I4 credits3GM. Mazzotti
AbstractNon-empirical design of gas-liquid, vapor-liquid, and liquid-liquid separation processes for ideal and non-ideal systems, based on mass transfer phenomena and phase equilibrium.
ObjectiveNon-empirical design of gas-liquid, vapor-liquid, and liquid-liquid separation processes for ideal and non-ideal systems, based on mass transfer phenomena and phase equilibrium.
ContentMethods for the non empirical design of equilibrium stage separations for ideal and non-ideal systems, based on mass transfer phenomena and phase equilibrium. Topics: introduction to the separation process technology. Phase equilibrium: vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid. Flash vaporization: binary and multicomponent. Equilibrium stages and multistage cascades. Gas absorption and stripping. Continuous distillation: design methods for binary and multicomponent systems; continuous-contact equipment; azeotropic distillation, equipment for gas-liquid operations. Liquid/liquid extraction. The lecture is supported by a web base learning tool, i.e. HyperTVT.
Lecture notesLecture notes available
LiteratureTreybal "Mass-transfer operations" oder Seader/Henley "Separation process principles" oder Wankat "Equilibrium stage separations" oder Weiss/Militzer/Gramlich "Thermische Verfahrenstechnik"
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Stoffaustausch

A self-learning web-based environment is available (HyperTVT):
http://www.spl.ethz.ch/
151-0928-00LCO2 Capture and Storage and the Industry of Carbon-Based Resources4 credits3GM. Mazzotti, L. Bretschger, N. Gruber, C. Müller, M. Repmann, T. Schmidt, D. Sutter
AbstractCarbon-based resources (coal, oil, gas): origin, production, processing, resource economics. Climate change: science, policies. CCS systems: CO2 capture in power/industrial plants, CO2 transport and storage. Besides technical details, economical, legal and societal aspects are considered (e.g. electricity markets, barriers to deployment).
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to introduce carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems, the technical solutions developed so far and the current research questions. This is done in the context of the origin, production, processing and economics of carbon-based resources, and of climate change issues. After this course, students are familiar with important technical and non-technical issues related to use of carbon resources, climate change, and CCS as a transitional mitigation measure.

The class will be structured in 2 hours of lecture and one hour of exercises/discussion. At the end of the semester a group project is planned.
ContentBoth the Swiss and the European energy system face a number of significant challenges over the coming decades. The major concerns are the security and economy of energy supply and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuels will continue to satisfy the largest part of the energy demand in the medium term for Europe, and they could become part of the Swiss energy portfolio due to the planned phase out of nuclear power. Carbon capture and storage is considered an important option for the decarbonization of the power sector and it is the only way to reduce emissions in CO2 intensive industrial plants (e.g. cement- and steel production).
Building on the previously offered class "Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS)", we have added two specific topics: 1) the industry of carbon-based resources, i.e. what is upstream of the CCS value chain, and 2) the science of climate change, i.e. why and how CO2 emissions are a problem.
The course is devided into four parts:
I) The first part will be dedicated to the origin, production, and processing of conventional as well as of unconventional carbon-based resources.
II) The second part will comprise two lectures from experts in the field of climate change sciences and resource economics.
III) The third part will explain the technical details of CO2 capture (current and future options) as well as of CO2 storage and utilization options, taking again also economical, legal, and sociatel aspects into consideration.
IV) The fourth part will comprise two lectures from industry experts, one with focus on electricity markets, the other on the experiences made with CCS technologies in the industry.
Throughout the class, time will be allocated to work on a number of tasks related to the theory, individually, in groups, or in plenum. Moreover, the students will apply the theoretical knowledge acquired during the course in a case study covering all the topics.
Lecture notesPower Point slides and distributed handouts
LiteratureIPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, 2018.
http://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15/

IPCC AR5 Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report, 2014. www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/syr/

IPCC Special Report on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage, 2005. www.ipcc.ch/activity/srccs/index.htm

The Global Status of CCS: 2014. Published by the Global CCS Institute, Nov 2014.
http://www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/global-status-ccs-2014
Prerequisites / NoticeExternal lecturers from the industry and other institutes will contribute with specialized lectures according to the schedule distributed at the beginning of the semester.
151-0940-00LModelling and Mathematical Methods in Process and Chemical Engineering4 credits3GM. Mazzotti
AbstractStudy of the non-numerical solution of systems of ordinary differential equations and first order partial differential equations, with application to chemical kinetics, simple batch distillation, and chromatography.
ObjectiveStudy of the non-numerical solution of systems of ordinary differential equations and first order partial differential equations, with application to chemical kinetics, simple batch distillation, and chromatography.
ContentDevelopment of mathematical models in process and chemical engineering, particularly for chemical kinetics, batch distillation, and chromatography. Study of systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), their stability, and their qualitative analysis. Study of single first order partial differential equation (PDE) in space and time, using the method of characteristics. Application of the theory of ODEs to population dynamics, chemical kinetics (Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction), and simple batch distillation (residue curve maps). Application of the method of characteristic to chromatography.
Lecture notesno skript
LiteratureA. Varma, M. Morbidelli, "Mathematical methods in chemical engineering," Oxford University Press (1997)
H.K. Rhee, R. Aris, N.R. Amundson, "First-order partial differential equations. Vol. 1," Dover Publications, New York (1986)
R. Aris, "Mathematical modeling: A chemical engineer’s perspective," Academic Press, San Diego (1999)
151-0944-00LCase Studies on Earth's Natural Resources
Does not take place this semester.
3 credits3SM. Mazzotti
AbstractBy working on case studies, built around everyday consumer products, and by applying engineering principles (e.g. material and energy balances), students will gain insight into natural resources, their usage in today's society, the challenges and the opportunities ensuing from the need to make their use long-term sustainable.
ObjectiveThe students are supposed to gain insight about our natural resources, and how their usage and supply relate to our society and to us as individuals. The students will analyse how the natural resources form and change, how they are extracted and used, and how we can utilize them in a sustainable way.
ContentThe students will analyze processes and products in terms of their use of natural resources. The study will use everyday consumer products as examples, will use engineering principles together with physics and chemistry fro the analysis, and will be based on documentation collected by the students withe the help of lecturer and assistants. Through these examples, the students will be made familiar with issues about the circular economy and recycling.
Lecture notesHandouts during the class.
LiteratureWalther, John V., "Earth's natural resources", (2014) Jones & Bartlett Learning // Oberle, B., Bringezu, S., Hatfield-Dodds, S., Hellweg, S., Schandl, H., Clement, J., "Global Resources Outlook 2019: Natural resources for the future we want - A Report of the International Resource Panel", (2019) United Nations Environment Programme.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents must be enrolled in a MSc or doctoral program at ETH Zurich.