From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence. Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Ruben Kretzschmar: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Name Prof. Dr. Ruben Kretzschmar
FieldBodenchemie
Address
I. f. Biogeochemie/Schadstoffdyn.
ETH Zürich, CHN F 23.1
Universitätstrasse 16
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 60 03
E-mailruben.kretzschmar@env.ethz.ch
DepartmentEnvironmental Systems Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
701-0034-06LIntegrated Practical: Soil Restricted registration - show details 3 credits3PR. Kretzschmar, S. Dötterl, D. Or, L. Walthert
AbstractDuring three full-day field trips and two half-day field exercises, various aspects of soil morphology, soil genesis, and soil functioning are discussed using practical examples.
ObjectiveGaining practical knowledge in soil science in the field.
ContentSoil description in the field, soil formation in Zurich-Nord, forest soils, carbon and nitrogen cycles, soil-water relations, soil conservation and landuse.
Lecture notesHandouts are provided during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse "Pedosphere" or equivalent
701-0362-00LSoils and Vegetation of the Alps (Excursion) Restricted registration - show details
Diese Exkursion (max. 24 Plätze) gehört zur Vorlesung «Flora und Vegetation der Alpen» (701-0364-00; A. Widmer). Sie kann nur gleichzeitig mit der Vorlesung oder nach bestandener Prüfung belegt werden. Alternativ ist eine Teilnahme möglich mit bestandenen Prüfungen in «Bodenchemie» (701-0533-00L; R. Kretzschmar, D.I. Christl) und «Pedosphäre» (701-0501-00L; R. Kretzschmar).
2 credits2PA. Widmer, R. Kretzschmar
AbstractThe excursion in the area of Davos illustrates how climatic and edaphic factors shape the distribution of alpine plants. Visits of multiple sites on different bedrocks in the subalpine and alpine elevational belts reveal connections between climatic conditions, soil formation and vegetation development.
ObjectiveThe students
- understand how parent rock, topography, climate, and vegetation influence soil forming processes and resulting soil properties (e.g. nutrients, water) in the Alps.
- understand, how climatic and edaphic factors affect the occurrence and distribution of alpine plants.
- are familiar with characteristic plant communities on acidic, basic and ultramafic bedrock in the subalpine and alpine elevational belts.
- know characteristic plant species and plant communities of the subalpine and alpine elevational belts in the Alps.
Content4-day excursion in the area of Davos with visits of sites on different bedrock (dolomite, gneiss/mica schist, amphibolite, serpentinite) in the subalpine and alpine elevational belts.
Structure, development and characteristics of the soils and of their effects on the vegetation; characteristic plant species and communities on different soil types.
Lecture notesA guide to the excursion will be made available.
LiteratureLandolt E. 2003: Unsere Alpenflora. 7.Aufl., SAC-Verlag.
Prerequisites / NoticePlease note that this course will be taught in German.
701-0501-AALPedosphere
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RR. Kretzschmar
AbstractIntroduction to the formation and properties of soils as a function of parent rock, landscape position, climate, and soil organisms. Complex relationships between soil forming processes, physical and chemical soil properties, soil biota, and ecological soil properties are explained and illustrated by numerous examples.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the formation and properties of soils as a function of parent rock, landscape position, climate, and soil organisms. Complex relationships between soil forming processes, physical and chemical soil properties, soil biota, and ecological soil properties are explained and illustrated by numerous examples.
ContentDefinition of the pedosphere, soil functions, rocks as parent materials, minerals and weathering, soil organisms, soil organic matter, physical soil properties and functions, chemical soil properties and functions, soil formation, principles of soil classification, global soil regions, soil fertility, land use and soil degradation.
Literature- Brady N.C. and Weil, R.R. The Nature and Properties of Soils. 14th ed. Prentice Hall, 2007.
701-1302-00LTerm Paper 2: Seminar Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.

Only for Environmental Sciences MSc.

Prerequisite: Term Paper 1: Writing (701-1303-00L).
2 credits2SL. Winkel, M. Ackermann, N. Gruber, J. Hering, R. Kretzschmar, M.  Lever, K. McNeill, A. N'Guyen van Chinh, D. Or, M. H. Schroth, B. Wehrli
AbstractThis class is the 2nd part of a series and participation is conditional on the successful completion of "Term Paper 1: Writing". The results from the term paper written during the previous term are presented to the other students and advisors and discussed with the audience.
ObjectiveThe goal of the term paper seminars is to train the student's ability to communicate (scientific) results to a wider audience and the ability to respond to questions and comments.
ContentEach student presents the results of their term paper to fellow students and advisors and responds to questions and comments from the audience.
Lecture notesGuidelines and supplementary material are distributed on the Moodle platform.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere is no final exam. Grade is assigned based on the quality of the presentation and ensuing discussion.

To obtain the credits, it is mandatory to attend at least 60% of all seminar dates offered in the fall and spring semester. Active participation in discussion and feedback rounds is expected.
701-1303-00LTerm Paper 1: Writing Restricted registration - show details
Only for Environmental Sciences MSc and Science, Technology and Policy MSc.
5 credits6AL. Winkel, M. Ackermann, N. Gruber, J. Hering, R. Kretzschmar, M.  Lever, K. McNeill, A. N'Guyen van Chinh, D. Or, M. H. Schroth, B. Wehrli
AbstractThe ability to critically evaluate original (scientific) literature and to summarise the information in a succinct manner is an important skill for any student. This course aims to practice this ability, requiring each student to write a term paper of scientific quality on a topic of relevance for research in the areas of biogeochemistry and pollutant dynamics.
ObjectiveThe goal of the term paper is to train the student's ability to critically evaluate scientific literature and to summarise the findings concisely in a paper addressing a research question.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:
- narrow down a research question.
- identify relevant literature to address the research question.
- concisely summarise and critically evaluate their findings.
- formulate key outstanding questions.
ContentEach student is expected to write a paper with a length of approximately 15-20 pages. The students can choose from a list of topics prepared by the tutors, but the final topic will be determined based on a balance of choice and availability. The students will be guided and advised by their tutors throughout the term.

The paper itself should contain the following elements:
- Motivation and context of the given topic (25%)
- Concise presentation and critical evaluation of the state of the science (50%)
- Identification of open questions and perhaps outline of opportunities for research (25%)

In addition, the accurate use of citations, attribution of ideas, and the judicious use of figures, tables, equations and references are critical components of a successful paper. Specialised knowledge is not expected, nor required; neither is new research.
Lecture notesGuidelines and supplementary material are distributed on the Moodle platform.
LiteratureOriginal scientific literature will be identified based on the chosen topic.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe term paper course is primarily aimed at master students majoring in biogeochemistry & pollutant dynamics and ISTP students with a solid background in natural sciences and a strong interest in biogeochemistry & pollutant dynamics.

Each students submits a term paper that will be reviewed by one fellow student and one faculty. The submission of the term paper and a written review of another student's term paper are a condition for obtaining the credit points.

There is no final exam. Grade is assigned based on the quality of the term paper and the submitted review as well as on the presentation in the following term.

Results from the term paper will be presented to fellow students and involved faculty in the following semester ("Term Paper 2: Seminar").