Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Frank Schimmelfennig: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Name Prof. Dr. Frank Schimmelfennig
FieldEuropäische Politik
Address
Professur für Europäische Politik
ETH Zürich, IFW D 45.1
Haldeneggsteig 4
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Award: The Golden Owl
Telephone+41 44 632 80 62
Fax+41 44 632 12 89
E-mailfrank.schimmelfennig@eup.gess.ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0587-00LCIS Colloquium Restricted registration - show details
This seminar is open for staff members based at the Center for Comparative and International Studies, CIS.
2 credits1KF. Schimmelfennig
AbstractIn this seminar staff members of the Center for Comparative and International Studies (CIS) and external guests present and discuss their research.
ObjectiveIn this seminar staff members of the Center for Comparative and International Studies (CIS) and external guests present and discuss their research.
ContentPresentation and discussion of current research.
Lecture notesDistributed electronically.
LiteratureDistributed electronically.
Prerequisites / NoticeDates of the Colloquium see:
http://www.cis.ethz.ch/events/colloquium
853-0048-00LInternational Politics: Theory and Methods (with Tutorat) Restricted registration - show details
Only for Public Policy BA.
4 credits3G + 1UF. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThe course covers the main theories (realism, institutionalism, liberalism, transnationalism and constructivism) as well as core problems of international politics such as war, peace, international cooperation and integration. The lectures are accompanied by a tutorial with case studies.
ObjectiveFirst, the course seeks to generate a better understanding of the central and specific problems of politics in the international realm, which result from the absence of centralized rule enforcement ("anarchy") . In addition, participants become familiar with the main theories of International Relations and the mechanisms and conditions these identify for solving international problems of security and cooperation. Case studies on areas and issues of international politics provide an overview of current international developments and an exemplary application of IR theory.
Content1. The subject-matter and problems of international politics

Theories
2. Power and Balance: Realism
3. Problem structures and negotiations in international politics
4. Interdependence and Institutions: Institutionalism and Transnationalism
5. Democracy and Society: Liberalism
6. Identity and Community: Constructivism

Issue Areas and Relationships
7. War: New Wars
8. Peace: The "long" and the "democratic" peace
9. Security cooperation: the new NATO
10. Economic cooperation: the world trade order
11. Human rights cooperation: global and regional human rights regimes
12. Legitimacy and Democracy in Global Governance
Lecture notesSchimmelfennig, Frank: Internationale Politik. Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag, 5. Auflage, 2017.
853-0048-01LInternational Politics: Theory and Methods3 credits3GF. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThe course covers the main theories (realism, institutionalism, liberalism, transnationalism and constructivism) as well as core problems of international politics such as war, peace, international cooperation and integration.
ObjectiveFirst, the course seeks to generate a better understanding of the central and specific problems of politics in the international realm, which result from the absence of centralized rule enforcement ("anarchy") . In addition, participants become familiar with the main theories of International Relations and the mechanisms and conditions these identify for solving international problems of security and cooperation. Case studies on areas and issues of international politics provide an overview of current international developments and an exemplary application of IR theory.
Content1. The subject-matter and problems of international politics

Theories
2. Power and Balance: Realism
3. Problem structures and negotiations in international politics
4. Interdependence and Institutions: Institutionalism and Transnationalism
5. Democracy and Society: Liberalism
6. Identity and Community: Constructivism

Issue Areas and Relationships
7. War: New Wars
8. Peace: The "long" and the "democratic" peace
9. Security cooperation: the new NATO
10. Economic cooperation: the world trade order
11. Human rights cooperation: global and regional human rights regimes
12. Legitimacy and Democracy in Global Governance
Lecture notesSchimmelfennig, Frank: Internationale Politik. Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag, 5. Auflage, 2017.
857-0051-00LComparative and EU Politics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

MA Comparative and International Studies are given priority.
8 credits2SF. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThis advanced research seminar deals with current issues and research in comparative politics and EU integration and politics.
ObjectiveThis seminar is designed for advanced students of political science with an interest in comparative European politics and EU integration and politics. It introduces students to state-of-the-art theorizing, data, methods, and empirical findings and provides them with opportunities to work with data on their own. After taking this seminar, students should have a good overview of current research and be prepared to write their Master's thesis in this area. Topics include: European integration, EU decision-making, parliaments in the EU and its member states, party groups and parliamentarians. Students may also propose research topics of their interest.
860-0001-00LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.

Priority for MSc Science, Technology, and Policy.
3 credits2.8GT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractStudents acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard.
ObjectivePublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
Lecture notesReading materials will be distributed electronically to the students when the semester starts.
LiteratureBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a Master level course. The course is capped at 25 students, with ISTP Master students having priority.
860-0001-01LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes; Research Paper Restricted registration - show details
Only for MSc Science, Technology, and Policy.

Prerequisite: you have to be enrolled in 860-0001-00L during the same semester.
3 credits3AT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThis is an add-on module to the course: 860-0001-00L. It focuses on students writing an essay on an issue covered by the main course 860-0001-00L.
ObjectiveStudents learn how to write an essay on a policy issue they select.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies - hence this course is complementary to the ISTP course on concepts and methods of policy analysis. Students learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (taught by Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (taught by Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (taught by Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organizations.
Lecture notesSee 860-0001-00L
LiteratureBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bernauer, T., Jahn, D., Kuhn, P., Walter, S. (2009, 2012): Einführung in die Politikwissenschaft (Introduction to Political Science). Baden-Baden: Nomos / UTB.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer, available as an ebook at ETH library.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Prerequisites / NoticeAccess only for ISTP MSc students also enrolled in 860-0001-00L