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529-0012-02L  General Chemistry (Inorganic Chemistry) II

SemesterSpring Semester 2016
LecturersH. Grützmacher, W. Uhlig
Periodicityyearly recurring course
Language of instructionGerman


Abstract1) General definitions 2) The VSEPR model 3) Qualitative molecular orbital diagrams 4) Closest packing, metal structures 5) The Structures of metalloids
6) Structures of the non-metals 7) Synthesis of the elements 8) Reactivity of the elements 9) Ionic Compounds 10) Ions in Solution 11) Element hydrogen compounds 12) Element halogen compounds 13) Element oxygen compounds 14) Redox chemistry
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the fundamental principles of the structures, properties, and reactivities of the main group elements (groups 1,2 and 13 to 18).
ContentThe course is divided in 14 sections in which the fundamental phenomena of the chemistry of the main group elements are discussed: Part 1: Introduction in the periodical properties of the elements and general definitions. – Part 2: The VSEPR model – Part 3: Qualitative molecular orbital diagrams for simple inorganic molecules – Part 4: Closest packing and structures of metals. – Part 5: The Structures of semimetals (metalloids) of the main group elements – Part 6: Structures of the non-metals– Part 7: Synthesis of the elements. – Part 8: Reactivity of the elements. – Part 9: Ionic Compounds. – Part 10: Ions in Solution. – Part 11: Element hydrogen compounds. – Part 12: Element halogen compounds. – Part 13: Element oxygen compounds. – Part 14: Redox chemistry.
Lecture notesThe transparencies used in the course are accessible via the internet on Link
LiteratureJ. Huheey, E. Keiter, R. Keiter, Inorganic Chemistry, Principles and Reactivity, 4th edition, deGruyter, 2003.

C.E.Housecroft, E.C.Constable, Chemistry, 4th edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2010.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasis for the understanding of this lecture is the course Allgemeine Chemie 1.