Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Integrated Building Systems Master Information
Main Courses
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
066-0418-00LWhole Building Simulation Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.
Priority will be given to MBS students.
W3 credits3GK. Orehounig, J. Allan
AbstractThis course discusses the application of whole building simulation in the design, operation, and retrofitting process of buildings and districts.
Objective- Understand energy and mass conservation principles in the analysis of energy performance of buildings;
- Use of building simulation in design, operation, and retrofitting process of buildings and districts;
- Integrating HVAC, renewable energy, storage technologies and district energy systems
- Annual simulations, system selection and sizing, heating and cooling calculations, summer comfort calculations
- Understand differences between building and district scale simulation
- Obtaining and interpreting simulation results, parametric studies and optimization results
Prerequisites / NoticeOnly a restricted number of places is available for this course. Priority will be given to MBS students. Please send an email to the lecturer after signing up in mystudies (if you are not a MBS student).
101-0588-01LRe-/Source the Built EnvironmentW3 credits2SG. Habert
AbstractThe course focuses on material choice and energy strategies to limit the environmental impact of construction sector. During the course, specific topics will be presented (construction technologies, environmental policies, social consequences of material use, etc.). The course aims to present sustainable options to tackle the global challenge we are facing and show that "it is not too late".
ObjectiveAfter the lecture series, the students are aware of the main challenges for the production and use of building materials.

They know the different technologies/propositions available, and environmental consequence of a choice.

They understand in which conditions/context one resource/technology will be more appropriate than another
ContentA general presentation of the global context allows to identify the objectives that as engineer, material scientist or architect needs to achieve to create a sustainable built environment.

The course is then conducted as a serie of guest lectures focusing on one specific aspect to tackle this global challenge and show that "it is not too late".

The lecture series is divided as follows:
- General presentation
- Notion of resource depletion, resilience, criticality, decoupling, etc.
- Guest lectures covering different resources and proposing different option to build or maintain a sustainable built environment.
Lecture notesFor each lecture slides will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture series will be conducted in English and is aimed at students of master's programs, particularly the departments ARCH, BAUG, ITET, MAVT, MTEC and USYS.

No lecture will be given during Seminar week.
227-0680-00LBuilding Control and AutomationW3 credits2V + 2UF. Bünning, J. Lygeros, A. Bollinger, C. Gähler, R. Smith
AbstractIntroduction to basic concepts from automatic control theory and their application to the control and automation of buildings.
ObjectiveIntroduce students to fundamental concepts from control theory: State space models, feedback. Demonstrate the application of these concepts to building control for energy efficiency and other objectives.
ContentIntroduction to modeling
State space models and differential equations
Laplace transforms and basic feedback control
Discrete time systems
Model predictive control for building climate regulation
Regulating building energy consumption and energy hub concepts
Practical implementation of Building Automation (BA) systems:
- Energy-efficient control of room air quality, heating and cooling, domestic hot water, shading, etc.
- Stability and robustness; Cascaded control
Prerequisites / NoticeExposure to ordinary differential equations and Laplace transforms.
066-0420-00LIndoor Environment, Resources and SafetyW3 credits3GA. Frangi, T. Larsen, S. M. Schoenwald
AbstractPrinciples of Building Acoustics, Water and Fire safety
ObjectiveBuilding Acoustics
- Fundamentals of sound: Sound waves, Sound sources and free field sound propagation, Sound descriptors and sound levels
- Sound fields in rooms: Reflection and absorption at boundaries, Diffuse sound fields (reverberation time), Room modes
- Airborne sound transmission through building elements I: Homogenous structures: Monolithic elements, Double leaf elements (walls, windows, ), Linings, toppings and additional layers
- Airborne sound transmission through building elements II: Assembled (lightweight) structures: Double leaf framed elements
- Impact sound transmission through building elements: Impact sources, Floor elements and floor toppings, Introduction structure-borne sound and vibration
- Sound transmission in buildings I: Composite elements, Flanking sound transmission I: Concept of flanking, Monolithic buildings
- Sound transmission in buildings II: Flanking sound transmission II: Lightweight framed buildings, Outline prediction methods, Noise from building systems and installations
- Measurement, Descriptors and Regulations: Standardized measurement techniques and protocols

Water
- water supply: water needs, possible resources, quality requirements for different applications and possible treatment processes
- water distribution: requirements for storage and piping
- wastewater: different type: urine, feces, blackwater, light and heavy greywater, rain water, treatment possibilities, hygienic and comfort requirements
- water cycles
- wastewater as a resource: polishing water, nutrients, energy
- integral solutions off the grid
- water as part of the urban environment and for recreational purposes in cities
- examples

Fire and Safety
- Fire safety objectives and regulations
- Fire safety concepts and measures
- Fire statistics
- Human behavior and escape
- Structural fire safety
- Technical fire safety
- Organizational fire safety
- Risk and probabilistic
- Economy of fire safety measures
066-0422-00LBuilding Systems II Information W3 credits3GA. Schlüter, L. Baldini, V. Dorer, I. Hischier, M. Sulzer
AbstractThe course gives an overview of concepts and design of building energy supply and ventilation systems, renewable technologies, thermal comfort, indoor air quality, and integrated systems both on building and on urban scale.
ObjectiveThe course has the following learning objectives:
- Knowledge of the fundamentals, principles and technologies for building heating and cooling, solar thermal systems, hybrid and mechanical ventilation, BIPV and Smart Energy Systems, Urban Energy Systems
- Knowledge of the integration and interdependencies of building systems and building structure, construction and aesthetics
- Ability to estimate relevant quantities and qualities for heating/ cooling of buildings and the related supply systems
- Ability to evaluate and choose an approach for sustainable heating/cooling, the system and its components
- Synthesis in own integrated design projects
Specialised Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0579-00LInfrastructure Management 2: Evaluation ToolsW4 credits2GB. T. Adey, C. Kielhauser
AbstractThis course provides tools to predict the service being provided by infrastructure in situations where the infrastructure is expected to

1) to evolve slowly with relatively little uncertainty over time, e.g. due to the corrosion of a metal bridge, and

2) to change suddenly with relatively large uncertainty, e.g. due to being washed away from an extreme flood.
ObjectiveThe course learning objective is to equip students with tools to be used to the service being provided from infrastructure.
The course increases a student's ability to analyse complex problems and propose solutions and to use state-of-the-art methods of analysis to assess complex problems
ContentReliability
Availability and maintainability
Regression analysis
Event trees
Fault trees
Markov chains
Neural networks
Bayesian networks
Lecture notesAll necessary materials (e.g. transparencies and hand-outs) will be distributed before class.
LiteratureAppropriate reading material will be assigned when necessary.
Prerequisites / NoticeAlthough not an official prerequisite, it is perferred that students have taken the IM1:Process course first. Understanding of the infrastructure management process enables a better understanding of where and how the tools introduced in this course can be used in the management of infrastructure.
102-0516-01LEnvironmental Impact AssessmentW3 credits2GS.‑E. Rabe
AbstractFocus of the course are the method, the process and content of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as well as the legal bases and methods for compiling an environmental impact study (EIS).
Using examples, a comprehensive view of the EIA is made possible by means of excursions.
In the frame of a project the process of am EIA will be workt out by the students.
Objective- Understanding the context of spatial planning and environmental protection
- Ability to use central planning instruments and procedures for assessing the environmental impacts and risks of projects
- Ability to apply quantitative methods to assess the environmental impacts and risks of projects
- Knowledge about the process and content of an EIA
- a capacity for critical review of environmental impact assessments
Content- Nominal and functional environmental protection in Switzerland
- Instruments of environmental protection
- Need for coordination between environmental protection and spatial planning
- Environmental Protection and environmental impact assessment
- Legal basis of the EIA
- Procedure of EIA
- Content of the EIA
- Content and structure of the EIS
- Application of the impact analysis
- Monitoring and Controlling
- View regarding the strategic environmental assessment (SEA)
- Excursions projects obligated under the EEA
Lecture notesNo script. The documents for the lecture can be found for download on the homepage of the Chair of Planning of Landscape and Urban Systems.

Download: http://irl.ethz.ch/de/education/vorlesungen/bsc/environmental_impact.html
Literature- Bundesamt für Umwelt 2009: UVP-Handbuch. Richtlinie des Bundes
für die Umweltverträglichkeitsprüfung. Umwelt-Vollzug Nr. 0923,
Bern. 156 S.
- Leitfäden zur UVP (werden in der Vorlesung bekannt gegben)
Prerequisites / NoticeAdditional information on mode of examination:
No calculators allowed
103-0357-00LEnvironmental Planning Information W3 credits2GM. Sudau, S.‑E. Rabe
AbstractThe lecture covers tools, methods and procedures of
Landscape and Environmental Planning developed. By means of field trips their implementation will be illustrated.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the various instruments and possibilities for the practical implementation of environmental planning.
Knowledge of the complex interactions of the instruments.
Content- forest planning
- inventories
- Intervention and compensation
- ecological network
- agricultural policy
- landscape development concepts (LEK)
- parks
- swiss concept of landscape
- riverine zone
- natural hazards
- field trips
Lecture notes- lecture notes concerning the instruments
- Handouts
- Copies of selected literature

Download: http://irl.ethz.ch/de/education/vorlesungen/bsc/environmental_planning.html
Prerequisites / NoticeAdditional information on mode of examination:
No calculators allowed
151-0102-00LFluid Dynamics IW6 credits4V + 2UT. Rösgen
AbstractAn introduction to the physical and mathematical foundations of fluid dynamics is given.
Topics include dimensional analysis, integral and differential conservation laws, inviscid and viscous flows, Navier-Stokes equations, boundary layers, turbulent pipe flow. Elementary solutions and examples are presented.
ObjectiveAn introduction to the physical and mathematical principles of fluid dynamics. Fundamental terminology/principles and their application to simple problems.
ContentPhenomena, applications, foundations
dimensional analysis and similitude; kinematic description; conservation laws (mass, momentum, energy), integral and differential formulation; inviscid flows: Euler equations, stream filament theory, Bernoulli equation; viscous flows: Navier-Stokes equations; boundary layers; turbulence
Lecture notesLecture notes (extended formulary) for the course are made available electronically.
LiteratureRecommended book: Fluid Mechanics, Kundu & Cohen & Dowling, 6th ed., Academic Press / Elsevier (2015).
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen: Physik, Analysis
151-0212-00LAdvanced CFD MethodsW4 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractFundamental and advanced numerical methods used in commercial and open-source CFD codes will be explained. The main focus is on numerical methods for conservation laws with discontinuities, which is relevant for trans- and hypersonic gas dynamics problems, but also CFD of incompressible flows, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo and the Lattice Boltzmann method are explained.
ObjectiveKnowing what's behind a state-of-the-art CFD code is not only important for developers, but also for users in order to choose the right methods and to achieve meaningful and accurate numerical results. Acquiring this knowledge is the main goal of this course.

Established numerical methods to solve the incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations are explained, whereas the focus lies on finite volume methods for compressible flow simulations. In that context, first the main theory and then numerical schemes related to hyperbolic conservation laws are explained, whereas not only examples from fluid mechanics, but also simpler, yet illustrative ones are considered (e.g. Burgers and traffic flow equations). In addition, two less commonly used yet powerful approaches, i.e., the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Lattice Boltzmann methods, are introduced.

For most exercises a C++ code will have to be modified and applied.
Content- Finite-difference vs. finite-element vs. finite-volume methods
- Basic approach to simulate incompressible flows
- Brief introduction to turbulence modeling
- Theory and numerical methods for compressible flow simulations
- Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC)
- Lattice Boltzmann method
Lecture notesPart of the course is based on the referenced books. In addition, the participants receive a manuscript and the slides.
Literature"Computational Fluid Dynamics" by H. K. Versteeg and W. Malalasekera.
"Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems" by R. J. Leveque.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in
- fluid dynamics
- numerical mathematics
- programming (programming language is not important, but C++ is of advantage)
151-0318-00LEcodesign - Environmental-Oriented Product DevelopmentW4 credits3GR. Züst
AbstractEcodesign has a great potential to improve the environmental performance of a product.
Main topics of the lecture: Motivation for Ecodesign; Methodical basics (defining environmental aspects; improvement strageies and measures); Ecodesign implementation (systematic guidance on integrating environmental considerations into product development) in a small project.
ObjectiveExperience shows that a significant part of the environmental impact of a business venture is caused by its own products in the pre and post-production areas. The goal of eco design is to reduce the total effect of a product on the environment in all phases of product life. The systematic derivation of promising improvement measures at the start of the product development process is a key skill that will be taught in the lectures.
The participants will discover the economic and ecological potential of ECODESIGN and acquire competence in determining goal-oriented and promising improvements and will be able to apply the knowledge acquired on practical examples.
ContentDie Vorlesung ist in drei Blöcke unterteilt. Hier sollen die jeweiligen Fragen beantwortet werden:
A) Motivation und Einstieg ins Thema: Welche Material- und Energieflüsse werden durch Produkte über alle Lebensphasen, d.h. von der Rohstoffgewinnung, Herstellung, Distribution, Nutzung und Entsorgungen verursacht? Welchen Einfluss hat die Produktentwicklung auf diese Auswirkungen?
B) Grundlagen zum ECODESIGN PILOT: Wie können systematisch – über alle Produktlebensphasen hinweg betrachtet – bereits zu Beginn der Produktentwicklung bedeutende Umweltauswirkungen erkannt werden? Wie können zielgerichtet diejenigen Ecodesign-Maßnahmen ermittelt werden, die das größte ökonomische und ökologische Verbesserungspotential beinhalten?
C) Anwendung des ECODESIGN PILOT: Welche Produktlebensphasen bewirken den größten Ressourcenverbrauch? Welche Verbesserungsmöglichkeiten bewirken einen möglichst großen ökonomischen und ökologischen Nutzen?
Im Rahmen der Vorlesung werden verschiedene Praktische Beispiel bearbeitet.
Lecture notesFür den Einstieg ins Thema ECODESIGN wurde verschiedene Lehrunterlagen entwickelt, die im Kurs zur Verfügung stehen und teilwesie auch ein "distance learning" ermöglichen:

Lehrbuch: Wimmer W., Züst R.: ECODESIGN PILOT, Produkt-Innovations-, Lern- und Optimierungs-Tool für umweltgerechte Produktgestaltung mit deutsch/englischer CD-ROM; Zürich, Verlag Industrielle Organisation, 2001. ISBN 3-85743-707-3

CD: im Lehrbuch inbegriffen (oder Teil "Anwenden" on-line via: www.ecodesign.at)
Internet: www.ecodesign.at vermittelt verschiedene weitere Zugänge zum Thema. Zudem werden CD's abgegeben, auf denen weitere Lehrmodule vorhanden sind.
LiteratureHinweise auf Literaturen werden on-line zur Verfügung gestellt.
Prerequisites / NoticeTestatbedingungen: Abgabe von zwei Übungen
227-0216-00LControl Systems II Information W6 credits4GR. Smith
AbstractIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ObjectiveIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ContentThis course is designed as a direct continuation of the course "Regelsysteme" (Control Systems). The primary goal is to further familiarize students with various dynamic phenomena and their implications for the analysis and design of feedback controllers. Simplifying assumptions on the underlying plant that were made in the course "Regelsysteme" are relaxed, and advanced concepts and techniques that allow the treatment of typical industrial control problems are presented. Topics include control of systems with multiple inputs and outputs, control of uncertain systems (robustness issues), limits of achievable performance, and controller implementation issues.
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture are available to download.
LiteratureSkogestad, Postlethwaite: Multivariable Feedback Control - Analysis and Design. Second Edition. John Wiley, 2005.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Control Systems or equivalent
151-0660-00LModel Predictive Control Information W4 credits2V + 1UM. Zeilinger
AbstractModel predictive control is a flexible paradigm that defines the control law as an optimization problem, enabling the specification of time-domain objectives, high performance control of complex multivariable systems and the ability to explicitly enforce constraints on system behavior. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of MPC and covers advanced topics.
ObjectiveDesign and implement Model Predictive Controllers (MPC) for various system classes to provide high performance controllers with desired properties (stability, tracking, robustness,..) for constrained systems.
Content- Review of required optimal control theory
- Basics on optimization
- Receding-horizon control (MPC) for constrained linear systems
- Theoretical properties of MPC: Constraint satisfaction and stability
- Computation: Explicit and online MPC
- Practical issues: Tracking and offset-free control of constrained systems, soft constraints
- Robust MPC: Robust constraint satisfaction
- Nonlinear MPC: Theory and computation
- Hybrid MPC: Modeling hybrid systems and logic, mixed-integer optimization
- Simulation-based project providing practical experience with MPC
Lecture notesScript / lecture notes will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeOne semester course on automatic control, Matlab, linear algebra.
Courses on signals and systems and system modeling are recommended. Important concepts to start the course: State-space modeling, basic concepts of stability, linear quadratic regulation / unconstrained optimal control.

Expected student activities: Participation in lectures, exercises and course project; homework (~2hrs/week).
227-0478-00LAcoustics II Information W6 credits4GK. Heutschi
AbstractAdvanced knowledge of the functioning and application of electro-acoustic transducers.
ObjectiveAdvanced knowledge of the functioning and application of electro-acoustic transducers.
ContentElectrical, mechanical and acoustical analogies. Transducers, microphones and loudspeakers, acoustics of musical instruments, sound recording, sound reproduction, digital audio.
Lecture notesavailable
363-0514-00LEnergy Economics and Policy
It is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example,"Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.
W3 credits2GM. Filippini
AbstractAn introduction to energy economics and policy that covers the following topics: energy demand, economics of energy efficiency, investments and cost analysis, energy markets (fossil fuels,electricity and renewable energy sources), market failures and behavioral anomalies, market-based and non-market based energy policy instruments and regulation of energy industries.
ObjectiveThe students will develop the understanding of economic principles and tools necessary to analyze energy issues and to formulate energy policy instruments. Emphasis will be put on empirical analysis of energy demand and supply, market failures, behavioral anomalies, energy policy instruments, investments in power plants and in energy efficiency technologies and the reform of the electric power sector.
ContentThe course provides an introduction to energy economics principles and policy applications. The first part of the course will introduce the microeconomic foundation of energy demand and supply as well as market failures and behavioral anomalies. In a second part, we introduce the concept of investment analysis (such as the NPV), in the context of energy efficient investments. In the last part, we use the previously introduced concepts to analyze energy policies: from a government perspective, we discuss the mechanisms and implications of market oriented and non-market oriented policy instruments as well as the regulation of energy industries.

Throughout the entire class, we combine the course material with insights from current research in energy economics. This combination will enable students to understand standard scientific literature in the field of energy economics. Moreover, the class aims to show students how to put real life situations in the energy sector in the context of insights from energy economics.

During the first part of the course a set of environmental and resource economics tools will be given to students through lectures. The applied nature of the course is achieved by discussing several papers in a seminar. To this respect, students are required to work in groups in order to prepare a presentation of a paper.

The evaluation policy is designed to verify the knowledge acquired by students during the course. For this purpose, a short group presentation will be graded. At the end of the course there will be a written exam covering the topics of the course. The final grade is obtained by averaging the presentation (20%) and the final exam (80%).
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example, "Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.
363-1000-00LFinancial EconomicsW3 credits2VA. Bommier
AbstractThis is a theoretical course on the economics of financial decision making, at the crossroads between Microeconomics and Finance. It discusses portfolio choice theory, risk sharing, market equilibrium and asset pricing.
ObjectiveThe objective is to make students familiar with the economics of financial decision making and develop their intuition regarding the determination of asset prices, the notions of optimal risk sharing. However this is not a practical formation for traders. Moreover, the lecture doesn't cover topics such as market irrationality or systemic risk.

After completing this course:
1. Students will be familiar with the economics of financial decision making and develop their intuition regarding the determination of asset prices;
2. Students will understand the intuition of market equilibrium. They will be able to solve the market equilibrium in a simple model and derive the prices of assets.
3. Students will be familiar with the representation of attitudes towards risk. They will be able to explain how risk, wealth and agents’ preferences affect the demand for assets.
4. Students will understand the notion of risk diversification.
5. Students will understand the notion of optimal risk sharing.
ContentThe following topics will be discussed:
1. Introduction to financial assets: The first lecture provides an overview of most common financial assets. We will also discuss the formation of asset prices and the role of markets in the valuation of these assets.

2. Option valuation: this lecture focuses on options, which are a certain type of financial asset. You will learn about arbitrage, which is a key notion to understand the valuation of options. This lecture will give you the intuition of the mechanisms underlying the pricing of assets in more general settings.

3. Introduction to the economic analysis of asset markets: this chapter will familiarize you with the notion of market equilibrium and the role it plays concerning asset pricing. Relying on economic theory, we will consider the properties of the market equilibrium: In which cases does the equilibrium exist? Is it optimal? How does it depend on individual’s wealth and preferences? The concepts defined in this chapter are essential to understand the following parts of the course.

4. A simplified approach to asset markets: based on the notions introduced in the previous lectures, you will learn about the key concepts necessary to understand financial markets, such as market completeness and the no-arbitrage theorem.

5. Choice under uncertainty: this class covers fundamental concepts concerning agents’ decisions when facing risk. These models are crucial to understand how the demand for financial assets originates.

6. Demand for risk: Building up on the previous chapters, we will study portfolio choice in a simplified setting. We will discuss how asset demand varies with risk, agent’s preferences and wealth.

7. Asset prices in a simplified context: We will focus on the portfolio choices of an investor, in a particular setting called mean-variance analysis. The mean-variance analysis will be a first step to introduce the notion of risk diversification, which is essential in finance.

8. Risk sharing and insurance: in this lecture, you will understand that risk can be shared among different agents and how, under certain conditions, this sharing can be optimal. You will learn about the distinction between individual idiosyncratic risk and macroeconomic risk.

9. Risk sharing and asset prices in a market equilibrium: this course builds up on previous lessons and presents the consumption-based Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). The focus will be on how consumption, assets and prices are determined in equilibrium.
LiteratureMain reading material:

- "Investments", by Z. Bodie, A. Kane and A. Marcus, for the
introductory part of the course (see chapters 20 and 21 in
particular).
- "Finance and the Economics of Uncertainty" by G. Demange and G. Laroque, Blackwell, 2006.
- "The Economics of Risk and Time", by C. Gollier, MIT Press, 2001.

Other readings:
- "Intermediate Financial Theory" by J.-P. Danthine and J.B. Donaldson.
- Ingersoll, J., E., Theory of Financial Decision Making, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers.
- Leroy S and J. Werner, Principles of Financial Economics, Cambridge University Press, 2001
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic mathematical skills needed (calculus, linear algebra, convex analysis). Students must be able to solve simple optimization problems (e.g. Lagrangian methods). Some knowledge in microeconomics would help but is not compulsory. The bases will be covered in class.
402-0812-00LComputational Statistical Physics Information W8 credits2V + 2UO. Zilberberg
AbstractComputer simulation methods in statistical physics. Classical Monte-Carlo-simulations: finite-size scaling, cluster algorithms, histogram-methods, renormalization group. Application to Boltzmann machines. Simulation of non-equilibrium systems.

Molecular dynamics simulations: long range interactions, Ewald summation, discrete elements, parallelization.
ObjectiveThe lecture will give a deeper insight into computer simulation methods in statistical physics. Thus, it is an ideal continuation of the lecture
"Introduction to Computational Physics" of the autumn semester. In the first part students learn to apply the following methods: Classical Monte Carlo-simulations, finite-size scaling, cluster algorithms, histogram-methods, renormalization group. Moreover, students learn about the application of statistical physics methods to Boltzmann machines and how to simulate non-equilibrium systems.

In the second part, students apply molecular dynamics simulation methods. This part includes long range interactions, Ewald summation and discrete elements.
ContentComputer simulation methods in statistical physics. Classical Monte-Carlo-simulations: finite-size scaling, cluster algorithms, histogram-methods, renormalization group. Application to Boltzmann machines. Simulation of non-equilibrium systems. Molecular dynamics simulations: long range interactions, Ewald summation, discrete elements, parallelization.
Lecture notesLecture notes and slides are available online and will be distributed if desired.
LiteratureLiterature recommendations and references are included in the lecture notes.
Prerequisites / NoticeSome basic knowledge about statistical physics, classical mechanics and computational methods is recommended.
529-0191-01LElectrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage TechnologiesW4 credits3GL. Gubler, E. Fabbri, J. Herranz Salañer
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the principles and applications of electrochemical energy conversion (e.g. fuel cells) and storage (e.g. batteries) technologies in the broader context of a renewable energy system.
ObjectiveStudents will discover the importance of electrochemical energy conversion and storage in energy systems of today and the future, specifically in the framework of renewable energy scenarios. Basics and key features of electrochemical devices will be discussed, and applications in the context of the overall energy system will be highlighted with focus on future mobility technologies and grid-scale energy storage. Finally, the role of (electro)chemical processes in power-to-X and deep decarbonization concepts will be elaborated.
ContentOverview of energy utilization: past, present and future, globally and locally; today’s and future challenges for the energy system; climate changes; renewable energy scenarios; introduction to electrochemistry; electrochemical devices, basics and their applications: batteries, fuel cells, electrolyzers, flow batteries, supercapacitors, chemical energy carriers: hydrogen & synthetic natural gas; electromobility; grid-scale energy storage, power-to-gas, power-to-X and deep decarbonization, techno-economics and life cycle analysis.
Lecture notesall lecture materials will be available for download on the course website.
Literature- M. Sterner, I. Stadler (Eds.): Handbook of Energy Storage (Springer, 2019).
- C.H. Hamann, A. Hamnett, W. Vielstich; Electrochemistry, Wiley-VCH (2007).
- T.F. Fuller, J.N. Harb: Electrochemical Engineering, Wiley (2018)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic physical chemistry background required, prior knowledge of electrochemistry basics desired.
101-0178-01LUncertainty Quantification in Engineering Information W3 credits2GS. Marelli
AbstractUncertainty quantification aims at studying the impact of aleatory and epistemic uncertainty onto computational models used in science and engineering. The course introduces the basic concepts of uncertainty quantification: probabilistic modelling of data (copula theory), uncertainty propagation techniques (Monte Carlo simulation, polynomial chaos expansions), and sensitivity analysis.
ObjectiveAfter this course students will be able to properly pose an uncertainty quantification problem, select the appropriate computational methods and interpret the results in meaningful statements for field scientists, engineers and decision makers. The course is suitable for any master/Ph.D. student in engineering or natural sciences, physics, mathematics, computer science with a basic knowledge in probability theory.
ContentThe course introduces uncertainty quantification through a set of practical case studies that come from civil, mechanical, nuclear and electrical engineering, from which a general framework is introduced. The course in then divided into three blocks: probabilistic modelling (introduction to copula theory), uncertainty propagation (Monte Carlo simulation and polynomial chaos expansions) and sensitivity analysis (correlation measures, Sobol' indices). Each block contains lectures and tutorials using Matlab and the in-house software UQLab (www.uqlab.com).
Lecture notesDetailed slides are provided for each lecture. A printed script gathering all the lecture slides may be bought at the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisites / NoticeA basic background in probability theory and statistics (bachelor level) is required. A summary of useful notions will be handed out at the beginning of the course.

A good knowledge of Matlab is required to participate in the tutorials and for the mini-project.
363-1038-00LSustainability Start-Up Seminar Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W3 credits2GA.‑K. Zobel, A. H. Sägesser
AbstractExperts lead participants through a venturing process inspired by Lean and Design Thinking methodologies. The course contains problem identification, idea generation and evaluation, team formation, and the development of one entrepreneurial idea per team. A special focus is put on sustainability, in particular on climate change and renewable energy technologies specifically.
Objective1. Students have experienced and know how to take the first steps towards co-creating a venture and potentially company
2. Students reflect deeply on sustainability issues (with a focus on climate change & energy) and can formulate a problem statement
3. Students believe in their ability to bring change to the world with their own ideas
4. Students are able to apply entrepreneurial practices such as the lean startup approach
5. Students have built a first network and know how to proceed and who to approach in case they would like to take their ventures further.
ContentThis course is aimed at people with a keen interest to address sustainability issues (with a focus on climate change and renewable energy), with a curious mindset, and potentially first entrepreneurial ideas!

The seminar consists of a mix of lectures, workshops, individual working sessions, teamwork, and student presentations/pitches. This class will be co-taught by an academic expert (studying innovation, entrepreneurship, and sustainability) and an entrepreneurship and sustainability “practitioner”. Real-world climate entrepreneurs and experts from the Swiss start-up and sustainability community will be invited to support individual sessions.

All course content is based on latest international entrepreneurship practices.

The seminar starts with an introduction to sustainability (with a special focus on climate change & energy) and entrepreneurship. Students are asked to self-select into an area of their interest in which they will develop entrepreneurial ideas throughout the course.

The first part of the course then focuses on deeply understanding sustainability problems within the area of interest. Through workshops and self-study, students will identify key design challenges, generate ideas, as well as provide systematic and constructive feedback to their peers.

In the second part of the course, students will form teams around their generated ideas. In these teams they will develop a business model and, following the lean start-up process, conduct real-life testing, as well as pivoting of these business models.

In the final part of the course, students present their insights gained from the lean start-up process, as well as pitch their entrepreneurial ideas and business models to an expert jury. The course will conclude with a session that provides students with a network and resources to further pursue their entrepreneurial journey.
Lecture notesAll material will be made available to the participants.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite:
Interest in sustainability & entrepreneurship.

Notes:
1. It is not required that participants already have a business idea at the beginning of the course.
2. No legal entities (e.g. GmbH, Association, AG) need to be founded for this course.

Target participants:
PhD students, Msc students and MAS students from all departments. The number of participants is limited to max.30.

Waiting list:
After subscribing you will be added to the waiting list.
The lecturers will contact you a few weeks before the start of the seminar to confirm your interest and to ensure a good mixture of study backgrounds, only then you're accepted to the course.
363-1060-00LStrategies for Sustainable Business Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.

Registration will only be effective once confirmed by email from the organizers.
W2 credits2SJ. Meuer
AbstractIn this course, students will learn to critically analyze strategies for sustainable business through exploring case studies on three main questions:
1. What is sustainability in business?
2. How do I design a sustainability strategy?
3. How do I implement a sustainability strategy?
ObjectiveAfter the course, you should be able to:

1. Understand and explain sustainability challenges companies are facing;
2. Critique sustainability and related strategies;
3. Evaluate decisions taken by managers;
4. Suggest alternative approaches;
5. Develop action plans;
6. Reflect on strategies for sustainability in their own organizations.

You will also learn to apply a range of strategy concepts to sustainability challenges, including leadership, stakeholder management, diversification, and organizational change.
ContentAlthough many companies nowadays report on their sustainability actions, only few successfully integrate sustainability into their business operations. In this seminar, we will cover three main questions that will help you to critically analyze and develop strategies for sustainable business:
1. What is sustainability in business?
2. How do I design a sustainability strategy?
3. How do I implement a sustainability strategy?

We teach the course with the case method developed at Harvard Business School. The case studies will allow us to explore from multiple perspectives the many tensions involved in developing strategies for sustainable business. We will distribute case study materials before the sessions, as well as guidelines on how best to efficiently and effectively prepare for case study discussions. You will need to read the materials and to submit short assignments before each class.

The sessions are interactive and allow you to step into the role of decision-makers as they face key challenges in integrating sustainability. For example, we will look at the challenges of Fairphone in combining both social and economic goals. Why and how would Patagonia want to encourage customers to buy less rather than more clothing? We also step into the shoes of RWE's CEO Peter Terium as he grapples with ensuring a profitable and sustainable future for the German utility. And using a change management simulation, you will experience why certain approaches to implementing a sustainability initiative in an organization are more successful than others. Our case discussions will help you to apply strategy concepts to real-world sustainability problems and will also serve as a basis for thinking about sustainability in your own company.
LiteratureWe will provide case study material and guidelines for analyzing cases to participants by email several weeks before the seminar.
Prerequisites / NoticeAfter signing up you will first be placed on the waiting list. We will contact all students on the waiting list by 1 March 2019 to confirm their participation in the seminar. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact Johannes Meuer (jmeuer@ethz.ch).
252-0220-00LIntroduction to Machine Learning Information Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants. Preference is given to students in programmes in which the course is being offered. All other students will be waitlisted. Please do not contact Prof. Krause for any questions in this regard. If necessary, please contact studiensekretariat@inf.ethz.ch
W8 credits4V + 2U + 1AA. Krause
AbstractThe course introduces the foundations of learning and making predictions based on data.
ObjectiveThe course will introduce the foundations of learning and making predictions from data. We will study basic concepts such as trading goodness of fit and model complexitiy. We will discuss important machine learning algorithms used in practice, and provide hands-on experience in a course project.
Content- Linear regression (overfitting, cross-validation/bootstrap, model selection, regularization, [stochastic] gradient descent)
- Linear classification: Logistic regression (feature selection, sparsity, multi-class)
- Kernels and the kernel trick (Properties of kernels; applications to linear and logistic regression); k-nearest neighbor
- Neural networks (backpropagation, regularization, convolutional neural networks)
- Unsupervised learning (k-means, PCA, neural network autoencoders)
- The statistical perspective (regularization as prior; loss as likelihood; learning as MAP inference)
- Statistical decision theory (decision making based on statistical models and utility functions)
- Discriminative vs. generative modeling (benefits and challenges in modeling joint vy. conditional distributions)
- Bayes' classifiers (Naive Bayes, Gaussian Bayes; MLE)
- Bayesian approaches to unsupervised learning (Gaussian mixtures, EM)
LiteratureTextbook: Kevin Murphy, Machine Learning: A Probabilistic Perspective, MIT Press
Prerequisites / NoticeDesigned to provide a basis for following courses:
- Advanced Machine Learning
- Deep Learning
- Probabilistic Artificial Intelligence
- Seminar "Advanced Topics in Machine Learning"
151-0306-00LVisualization, Simulation and Interaction - Virtual Reality I Information W4 credits4GA. Kunz
AbstractTechnology of Virtual Reality. Human factors, Creation of virtual worlds, Lighting models, Display- and acoustic- systems, Tracking, Haptic/tactile interaction, Motion platforms, Virtual prototypes, Data exchange, VR Complete systems, Augmented reality, Collaboration systems; VR and Design; Implementation of the VR in the industry; Human Computer Interfaces (HCI).
ObjectiveThe product development process in the future will be characterized by the Digital Product which is the center point for concurrent engineering with teams spreas worldwide. Visualization and simulation of complex products including their physical behaviour at an early stage of development will be relevant in future. The lecture will give an overview to techniques for virtual reality, to their ability to visualize and to simulate objects. It will be shown how virtual reality is already used in the product development process.
ContentIntroduction to the world of virtual reality; development of new VR-techniques; introduction to 3D-computergraphics; modelling; physical based simulation; human factors; human interaction; equipment for virtual reality; display technologies; tracking systems; data gloves; interaction in virtual environment; navigation; collision detection; haptic and tactile interaction; rendering; VR-systems; VR-applications in industry, virtual mockup; data exchange, augmented reality.
Lecture notesA complete version of the handout is also available in English.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen:
keine
Vorlesung geeignet für D-MAVT, D-ITET, D-MTEC und D-INF

Testat/ Kredit-Bedingungen/ Prüfung:
– Teilnahme an Vorlesung und Kolloquien
– Erfolgreiche Durchführung von Übungen in Teams
– Mündliche Einzelprüfung 30 Minuten
063-0610-00LThe Digital in ArchitectureW2 credits1V + 2UF. Gramazio, M. Kohler
AbstractIn lecture series coupled with a series of taught exercises, the course establishes a conceptual framework of digital fabrication in architecture. The exercises focus on simple yet powerful methods of digital, computational and algorithmic design. Two seminar sessions open a debate on the digital as a driving force of a future building and architecture culture.
ObjectiveStudents develop an understanding of the digital and its concepts in architecture and of current developments in the field of digital fabrication. Students learn about design strategies based on digital methods and are able to relate these to their own design approach and its wider context at the Department of Architecture. In the exercises, they learn to use Rhino 5 / Grasshopper and write their first code in Python. The aim is to equip students with the necessary intellectual and technical skills that allow them to independently deepen their engagement with the digital in the chosen design studios.
ContentThe course consists of a lecture series coupled with a series of taught exercises. Departing from the work of Gramazio Kohler Research, the lectures establish a conceptual framework of the digital in architecture with special regard to digital fabrication. The exercises focus on simple yet powerful methods of digital, computational and algorithmic design. Two seminar sessions are dedicated to an open debate on the digital as a driving force of a future building and architecture culture.
Prerequisites / NoticePool Introduction Event:
Informationon event on all the courses offered by the ITA (Institute of Technology in Architecture):
Monday, 17th February 2020, 11-12 h, HIB Open Space!
376-1178-00LHuman Factors IIW3 credits2VM. Menozzi Jäckli, R. Huang, M. Siegrist
AbstractStrategies, abilities and needs of human at work as well as properties of products and systems are factors controlling quality and performance in everyday interactions. In Human Factors II (HF II), cognitive aspects are in focus therefore complementing the more physical oriented approach in HF I. A basic scientific approach is adopted and relevant links to practice are illustrated.
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to empower students in designing products and systems enabling an efficient and qualitatively high standing interaction between human and the environment, considering costs, benefits, health, well-being, and safety as well. The goal is achieved in addressing a broad variety of topics and embedding the discussion in macroscopic factors such as the behavior of consumers and objectives of economy.
ContentCognitive factors in perception, information processing and action. Experimental techniques in assessing human performance and well-being, human factors and ergonomics in development of products and complex systems, innovation, decision taking, consumer behavior.
LiteratureSalvendy G. (ed), Handbook of Human Factors, Wiley & Sons, 2012
101-0523-00LIndustrialized Construction Restricted registration - show details W4 credits3GD. Hall
AbstractThis course offers an introduction and overview to Industrialized Construction, a rapidly-emerging concept in the construction industry. The course will present the driving forces, concepts, technologies, and managerial aspects of Industrialized Construction, with an emphasis on current industry applications and future entrepreneurial opportunities in the field.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course, students should be able to:
1. Describe the characteristics of the nine integrated areas of industrialized construction: planning and control of processes; developed technical systems; prefabrication; long-term relations; logistics; use of ICT; re-use of experience and measurements; customer and market focus; continuous improvement.
2. Assess case studies on successful or failed industry implementations of industrialized construction in Europe, Japan and North America.
3. Propose a framework for a new industrialized construction company for a segment of the industrialized construction market (e.g. housing, commercial, schools) including the company’s business model, technical platform, and supply chain strategy.
4. Identify future trends in industrialized construction including the use of design automation, digital fabrication, and Industry 4.0.
ContentThe application of Industrialized Construction - also referred to as prefabrication, offsite building, or modular construction – is rapidly increasing in the industry. Although the promise of industrialized construction has long gone unrealized, several market indicators show that this method of construction is quickly growing around the world. Industrialized Construction offers potential for increased productivity, efficiency, innovation, and safety on the construction site. The course will present the driving forces, concepts, technologies, and managerial aspects of Industrialized Construction. The course unpacks project-orientated vs. product-oriented approaches while showcasing process and technology platforms used by companies in Europe, the UK, Japan, and North America. The course highlights future business models and entrepreneurial opportunities for new industrialized construction ventures.

The course is organized around a group project carried out in teams of 3-4. The project begins in week 6 of the course, and collaborative group work will occur during the Wednesday sessions. Teams will be required to propose a framework for a new industrialized construction venture including the company’s product offering, business model, technical platform, and supply chain strategy.

The planned course activities include a 1/2 day factory visit (UPDATE confirmed date is Friday, March 20), a tour of the NCCR dfab laboratory, and five reflection assignments. Students who are unable to attend the visits can make up participation through independent research and the writing of a short paper.
LiteratureA full list of required readings will be made available to the students via Moodle.
063-0640-00LAdvanced Computational Design
Limited number of participants.
W3 credits3GB. Dillenburger
AbstractIn this course we will discuss how strategies of Artificial Intelligence such as Machine Learning or Evolutionary Strategies can be used in the design process. Principal concepts of computational geometry for architecture will be connected with methods to automatically generate, evaluate and search for design solutions.
ObjectiveStudents will understand programming basics, and will learn how to control geometry using code. They will learn to translate a design concept into an algorithmic approach - or vice versa - and will obtain an awareness of potentials and limitations of AI in the design phase. Students will deepen their knowledge in customizing existing CAD software such as Rhino using scripting.
ContentIn this course we will discuss how concepts of Artificial Intelligence can be used in the design process. In tutorials and exercises, we will explore the use strategies such as Machine Learning or Evolutionary Strategies to turn the computer from a drawing instrument into an active partner in design, extending both the imagination and the intuition of the designer.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuccessful completion of the course "Structural Design VI" (063-0606-00L), "Design III" (052-0541/43/45) or "Das Digitale in der Architektur" (063-0610-00L) are recommended
103-0448-01LTransformation of Urban Landscapes
Only for masters students, otherwise a special permit of the lecturer is necessary.
W3 credits2GJ. Van Wezemael, A. Gonzalez Martinez
AbstractThe lecture course addresses the transformation of urban landscapes towards sustainable inward development. The course reconnects two largely separated complexity approaches in «spatial planning» and «urban sciences» as a basic framework to look at a number of spatial systems considering economic, political, and cultural factors. Focus lies on participation and interaction of students in groups.
Objective- Understand cities as complex adaptive systems
- Understand planning in a complex context and planning competitions as decision-making
- Seeing cities through big data and understand (Urban) Governance as self-organization
- Learn Design-Thinking methods for solving problems of inward development
- Practice presentation skills
- Practice argumentation and reflection skills by writing critiques
- Practice writing skills in a small project
- Practice teamwork
ContentStarting point and red thread of the lecture course is the transformation of urban landscapes as we can see for example across the Swiss Mittelland - but in fact also globally. The lecture course presents a theoretical foundation to see cities as complex systems. On this basis it addresses practical questions as well as the complex interplay of economic, political or spatial systems.

While cities and their planning were always complex the new era of globalization exposed and brought to the fore this complexity. It created a situation that the complexity of cities can no longer be ignored. The reason behind this is the networking of hitherto rather isolated places and systems across scales on the basis of Information and Communication Technologies. «Parts» of the world still look pretty much the same but we have networked them and made them strongly interdependent. This networking fuels processes of self-organization. In this view regions emerge from a multitude of relational networks of varying geographical reach and they display intrinsic timescales at which problems develop. In such a context, an increasing number of planning problems remain unaffected by either «command-and-control» approaches or instruments of spatial development that are one-sidedly infrastructure- or land-use orientated. In fact, they urge for novel, more open and more bottom-up assembling modes of governance and a «smart» focus on how space is actually used. Thus, in order to be effective, spatial planning and governance must be reconceptualised based on a complexity understanding of cities and regions, considering self-organizing and participatory approaches and the increasingly available wealth of data.
LiteratureA reader with original papers will be provided via the ILIAS system.
Prerequisites / NoticeOnly for masters students, otherwise a special permit of the lecturer is necessary.
252-0834-00LInformation Systems for Engineers Information
Wird ab HS20 nur in Herbstsemester angeboten.
W4 credits2V + 1UG. Fourny
AbstractThis course provides the basics of relational databases from the perspective of the user.

We will discover why tables are so incredibly powerful to express relations, learn the SQL query language, and how to make the most of it. The course also covers support for data cubes (analytics).
ObjectiveThis lesson is complementary with Big Data for Engineers as they cover different time periods of database history and practices -- you can even take both lectures at the same time.

After visiting this course, you will be capable to:

1. Explain, in the big picture, how a relational database works and what it can do in your own words.

2. Explain the relational data model (tables, rows, attributes, primary keys, foreign keys), formally and informally, including the relational algebra operators (select, project, rename, all kinds of joins, division, cartesian product, union, intersection, etc).

3. Perform non-trivial reading SQL queries on existing relational databases, as well as insert new data, update and delete existing data.

4. Design new schemas to store data in accordance to the real world's constraints, such as relationship cardinality

5. Explain what bad design is and why it matters.

6. Adapt and improve an existing schema to make it more robust against anomalies, thanks to a very good theoretical knowledge of what is called "normal forms".

7. Understand how indices work (hash indices, B-trees), how they are implemented, and how to use them to make queries faster.

8. Access an existing relational database from a host language such as Java, using bridges such as JDBC.

9. Explain what data independence is all about and didn't age a bit since the 1970s.

10. Explain, in the big picture, how a relational database is physically implemented.

11. Know and deal with the natural syntax for relational data, CSV.

12. Explain the data cube model including slicing and dicing.

13. Store data cubes in a relational database.

14. Map cube queries to SQL.

15. Slice and dice cubes in a UI.

And of course, you will think that tables are the most wonderful object in the world.
ContentUsing a relational database
=================
1. Introduction
2. The relational model
3. Data definition with SQL
4. The relational algebra
5. Queries with SQL

Taking a relational database to the next level
=================
6. Database design theory
7. Databases and host languages
8. Databases and host languages
9. Indices and optimization
10. Database architecture and storage

Analytics on top of a relational database
=================
12. Data cubes

Outlook
=================
13. Outlook
Literature- Lecture material (slides).

- Book: "Database Systems: The Complete Book", H. Garcia-Molina, J.D. Ullman, J. Widom
(It is not required to buy the book, as the library has it)
Prerequisites / NoticeFor non-CS/DS students only, BSc and MSc
Elementary knowledge of set theory and logics
Knowledge as well as basic experience with a programming language such as Pascal, C, C++, Java, Haskell, Python
051-0912-20LSeminar Week Spring Semester 2020 Information Restricted registration - show details
Im FS20 darf nur eine Seminarwoche belegt werden 051-0912-20L oder 051-0914-20L.
W2 credits3ALecturers
AbstractThe seminar week is obligatory for students of all semesters. There are many and varied study contents - the programs are listed at the beginning of each semester.
ObjectiveThe students will be enabled to discuss narrowly formulated factual questions in small groups and in direct contact with the professors.
ContentThe seminar week is obligatory for students of all semesters. There are many and varied study contents - the programs are listed at the beginning of each semester.
052-0568-00LRoom Acoustics (FS) Information W2 credits2GK. Eggenschwiler
AbstractInfluence of form and material on speech and music within spaces. Special requirements of acoustically sensitive spaces such as school rooms, music rooms, theaters, concert halls, opera buildings and churches (historical and modern buildings). Scientific ways of calculating and assessing acoustics. Basic introduction to sound systems for speech.
ObjectiveThe students learn to recognise the importance of acoustic factors and to design spaces with appropriate acoustical properties.
ContentWe will begin by focusing on the acoustic dimension of space without excluding the other non-auditory senses. Following this, the influence of form and material on hearing and the characteristics of the spoken word and music within spaces will be explored by means of examples and with the aid of the special instruments of acoustic science. We will then discuss the special requirements of acoustically sensitive spaces such as school rooms, music rooms, theaters, concert halls, opera buildings, and churches. This study takes the form of both theory, and real examples of historical and modern buildings. Scientific ways of calculating and assessing acoustics is presented and a basic introduction to the sound system
design for speech is made.
Lecture notesScript in German
252-3900-00LBig Data for Engineers Information
This course is not intended for Computer Science and Data Science MSc students!
W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AG. Fourny
AbstractThis course is part of the series of database lectures offered to all ETH departments, together with Information Systems for Engineers. It introduces the most recent advances in the database field: how do we scale storage and querying to Petabytes of data, with trillions of records? How do we deal with heterogeneous data sets? How do we deal with alternate data shapes like trees and graphs?
ObjectiveThis lesson is complementary with Information Systems for Engineers as they cover different time periods of database history and practices -- you can even take both lectures at the same time.

The key challenge of the information society is to turn data into information, information into knowledge, knowledge into value. This has become increasingly complex. Data comes in larger volumes, diverse shapes, from different sources. Data is more heterogeneous and less structured than forty years ago. Nevertheless, it still needs to be processed fast, with support for complex operations.

This combination of requirements, together with the technologies that have emerged in order to address them, is typically referred to as "Big Data." This revolution has led to a completely new way to do business, e.g., develop new products and business models, but also to do science -- which is sometimes referred to as data-driven science or the "fourth paradigm".

Unfortunately, the quantity of data produced and available -- now in the Zettabyte range (that's 21 zeros) per year -- keeps growing faster than our ability to process it. Hence, new architectures and approaches for processing it were and are still needed. Harnessing them must involve a deep understanding of data not only in the large, but also in the small.

The field of databases evolves at a fast pace. In order to be prepared, to the extent possible, to the (r)evolutions that will take place in the next few decades, the emphasis of the lecture will be on the paradigms and core design ideas, while today's technologies will serve as supporting illustrations thereof.

After visiting this lecture, you should have gained an overview and understanding of the Big Data landscape, which is the basis on which one can make informed decisions, i.e., pick and orchestrate the relevant technologies together for addressing each business use case efficiently and consistently.
ContentThis course gives an overview of database technologies and of the most important database design principles that lay the foundations of the Big Data universe.

It targets specifically students with a scientific or Engineering, but not Computer Science, background.

We take the monolithic, one-machine relational stack from the 1970s, smash it down and rebuild it on top of large clusters: starting with distributed storage, and all the way up to syntax, models, validation, processing, indexing, and querying. A broad range of aspects is covered with a focus on how they fit all together in the big picture of the Big Data ecosystem.

No data is harmed during this course, however, please be psychologically prepared that our data may not always be in normal form.

- physical storage: distributed file systems (HDFS), object storage(S3), key-value stores

- logical storage: document stores (MongoDB), column stores (HBase)

- data formats and syntaxes (XML, JSON, RDF, CSV, YAML, protocol buffers, Avro)

- data shapes and models (tables, trees)

- type systems and schemas: atomic types, structured types (arrays, maps), set-based type systems (?, *, +)

- an overview of functional, declarative programming languages across data shapes (SQL, JSONiq)

- the most important query paradigms (selection, projection, joining, grouping, ordering, windowing)

- paradigms for parallel processing, two-stage (MapReduce) and DAG-based (Spark)

- resource management (YARN)

- what a data center is made of and why it matters (racks, nodes, ...)

- underlying architectures (internal machinery of HDFS, HBase, Spark)

- optimization techniques (functional and declarative paradigms, query plans, rewrites, indexing)

- applications.

Large scale analytics and machine learning are outside of the scope of this course.
LiteraturePapers from scientific conferences and journals. References will be given as part of the course material during the semester.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is not intended for Computer Science and Data Science students. Computer Science and Data Science students interested in Big Data MUST attend the Master's level Big Data lecture, offered in Fall.

Requirements: programming knowledge (Java, C++, Python, PHP, ...) as well as basic knowledge on databases (SQL). If you have already built your own website with a backend SQL database, this is perfect.

Attendance is especially recommended to those who attended Information Systems for Engineers last Fall, which introduced the "good old databases of the 1970s" (SQL, tables and cubes). However, this is not a strict requirement, and it is also possible to take the lectures in reverse order.
Project Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
363-1056-00LInnovation Leadership Restricted registration - show details
Up to four slots are available for students in architecture or civil engineering (Master level) or for D-MTEC MAS/MSc students with architecture or civil engineering background.

If you are NOT a student in Integrated Building Systems, you need to apply with motivation letter (max. 1 page), CV and a transcript of records no later than 31 January 2020. Please send your application to Zorica Zagorac (zzagorac@ethz.ch).
W6 credits3SD. Laureiro Martinez, C. P. Siegenthaler, Z. Zagorac-Uremovic
AbstractThis course provides participants with the challenging opportunity of working on an innovation project of a leading company in the Swiss building industry.
ObjectiveStudents work in teams, on a concrete innovation project that is currently affecting the strategic agenda of the top management team of a leading company in the Swiss building industry. Students conduct interviews with internal and external experts, as well as company clients. By doing so, students gain first-hand experience on the competitive dynamics of the construction industry and as a group, work on proposing a solution to the company’s innovation project.
The course emphasizes the use and development of self-directedness and critical thinking abilities. In parallel to working on the innovation project, students work on their own learning goals. Students first define their very own learning goals and then are assessed and graded on whether they have progressed towards achieving such learning goals.
Students learn to:
• Reflect and explore personal learning goals and discover new aspects of their leadership abilities
• Learn to work in an unknown direction with no certain outcome
• Explore how a project with internal and external stakeholders works when people have conflicting interests, that might also vary according to the different time perspectives that are taken into account
• Use design thinking and solution-oriented coaching techniques
ContentThe course uses participant-centered tools that encourage students' reflection and boost their personal development, their creative output and help them to discover their own approach to leadership. The course offers multiple opportunities to learn about technical aspects in a real corporate environment. The setup is a social environment in which trial-and-error learning is encouraged. The course focuses on three areas of development: Project management, innovation and leadership.
Project Management: Students learn to self-manage their project while being supported by numerous project management techniques, coaching exercises, and individual feedback through learning diaries. An additional focus is given to design thinking methods and prototyping tools.

Innovation: Students learn about specific topics related to current innovation in the building sector in Switzerland. They learn to understand technology changes with an ecosystems view and think about the impact of new technologies in the building industry company (e.g. the commercialization of Building Information Modelling, BIM).
Leadership: Students conduct a project with diverse stakeholders requiring them to take managerial, technical, and personal responsibility for the company case. This high-pressure environment leads to an intense self-reflection journey, team experience and fosters proactive behaviors towards the client.
- On the individual level, students have to identify and achieve their very own authentic learning goals. Coaching tools involve a learning diary, which questions evolve during the semester, and a self-assessment of individual abilities and traits, which complements the reflective journey.
- On the team level, students are teamed up to deliver a solution proposal to the company’s project. The teams are diverse and the students’ work focuses on cooperativeness and how to be effective team members. Teaching tools involve peer-to-peer feedback, coaching and open space workshops.
- On the company level, students learn how to deal with different stakeholders and how to create impactful and sustainable solutions for their client.
Prerequisites / NoticeUp to four slots are available for students in architecture or civil engineering (Master level) or for D-MTEC MAS/MSc students with architecture or civil engineering background.

If you are NOT a student in Integrated Building Systems, you need to apply with motivation letter (max. 1 page), CV and a transcript of records no later than 31 January 2020. Please send your application to Zorica Zagorac (zzagorac@ethz.ch). Incomplete or late applications will not be considered.
Semester Project
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
066-0431-00LSemester Project MBS Restricted registration - show details
Semester projects are supervised and reviewed by one or several professors and possibly by other persons at the same time. At least one professor has to be a member of a department involved in the study programme (article 2). This regulation is also valid for semester projects taking place outside ETH Zurich.

You can choose the mentoring professor of your semester project MBS:
Jan CARMELIET
Stefano BRUSONI
Guillaume HABERT
Daniel HALL
John LYGEROS
Marco MAZZOTTI
Arno SCHLÜTER
Roy SMITH
O6 credits13AProfessors
AbstractThe semester project focuses in solving specific research questions in the field of integrated building systems.
ObjectiveThe semester project is designed to train students in solving specific research questions in the field of integrated building systems. The goal is to apply acquired knowledge which is gained throughout the first year of the master's program. The semester project is advised by a professor who is affiliated with one of the partner departments of the Master program "Integrated building systems".
ContentThe semester project is designed to train students in solving specific research questions in the field of integrated building systems. The goal is to apply acquired knowledge which is gained throughout the first year of the master's program. The semester project is advised by a professor who is affiliated with one of the partner departments of the Master program "Integrated building systems".
GESS Science in Perspective
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
» see Science in Perspective: Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Capability
» Recommended Science in Perspective (Type B) for D-ARCH.
» see Science in Perspective: Language Courses ETH/UZH
851-0107-00LScience and the Public: A Problem of Mediation that the Media Have to Solve? Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SU. J. Wenzel
AbstractWhat can, what should, what do "laymen" want to know and understand from scientific findings? How and what is "conveyed" in reporting on science? Does science journalism have to follow scientific criteria? How do the natural sciences differ from the humanities and social sciences in terms of "comprehensibility" and public visibility?
ObjectiveGaining insights into the relationship between the sciences, the public and the media, into their historical development and current problems - with particular reference to the "Wissenschaftsfeuilleton".
ContentThe feuilleton of the «Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung» of 27 June 2000 has gone down in the annals of recent media history. The last sequences of the fully mapped human genetic code were printed on six large-format pages: the letters A, G, C and T in various combinations and sequences - a «readable » but incomprehensible jumble of letters. What at the time was astounding journalistic coup and met with enthusiasm as well as head shaking can (also) be read as an allegory of the tense relationship between science and the public. What can, what should, what do «laymen» want to know and understand from scientific findings? What role do the media play, does science journalism play in this? How and what is «conveyed» in reporting on scientific findings? And does science journalism have to follow scientific criteria in such reporting? How do the natural sciences, medicine and technology differ from the humanities and social sciences in terms of «comprehensibility» and public awareness? Are we really dealing with two diverging «science cultures» - and two different ways of presenting them in the media?
These questions will be explored on some excursions into recent and also older media, scientific and cultural history.
851-0006-00LWater in the Early Modern Period: A Material and Environmental History Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2ST. Asmussen
AbstractThe seminar deals with questions of how water was perceived, used and appropriated in medieval and early modern societies. We examine water as a livelihood (drinking water, irrigation resource), energy source, transport medium, infrastructure and threat between 1400 and 1800.
ObjectiveThe students acquire historical knowledge of how pre-modern societies appropriated the natural substance water and how they themselves were formed and changed by the interactions with the liquid element. Students are expected to read original German, French and English sources.
ContentThe seminar examines the history of the substance and uses of water from the late Middle Ages to the 18th century. Using text and image sources, we will examine the physical, cultural, economic and scientific-technical implications of the relationship between man and water in plenary sessions and groups.
We deal with (al-)chemical analyses of water in the context of medical treatises and spas, the expansion and challenges of the water infrastructure ( fountains, sewage canals, irrigation canals, inland waterways), the associated changes of landscapes as well as with water as a threat (floods).
851-0109-00LPublic Images of ScienceW3 credits2VM. Bucchi
AbstractThe course will analize in a historical and sociological approach the public images of science and scientists and their major changes.
ObjectiveIn particular, we will explore the following subjects: the role of the visual element in the communication of science and its public representation; the role of ‘visible scientists’, with particular consideration of Nobel Prize winners; events and affairs that have shaped the public perception of science and the relationship between science and society.
ContentThe course will analize in a historical and sociological approach the public images of science and scientists and their major changes.
In particular, we will explore the following subjects: the role of the visual element in the communication of science and its public representation; the role of ‘visible scientists’, with particular consideration of Nobel Prize winners; events and affairs that have shaped the public perception of science and the relationship between science and society.
Various examples will be quoted and discussed, and will illustrate the Italian science and its relationship to society and to the various cultural fields (literature, visual arts, gastronomy), with particular reference to the period from the second half of the 19th century until the end of the 20th century.
851-0521-00LComputer History. An IntroductionW3 credits2VD. Gugerli
AbstractThe lecture will explore the question of how the world got into the computer. The history of this great move in the second half of the 20th century is told by focusing on bottlenecks, the overcoming of which has created new difficulties.
ObjectiveThe students learn to understand the effects of techno-historical narratives and arguments.
Lecture notesThe exact programme will be presented at the beginning of the semester.
851-0609-04LThe Energy Challenge - The Role of Technology, Business and Society Information
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in economics.
W2 credits2VR. Schubert, T. Schmidt, B. Steffen
AbstractIn recent years, energy security, risks, access and availability are important issues. Strongly redirecting and accelerating technological change on a sustainable low-carbon path is essential. The transformation of current energy systems into sustainable ones is not only a question of technology but also of the goals and influences of important actors like business, politics and society.
ObjectiveIn this course different options of sustainable energy systems like fossile energies, nuclear energy or all sorts of renewable energies are explained and discussed. The students should be able to understand and identify advantages and disadvantages of the different technological options and discuss their relevance in the business as well as in the societal context.
Lecture notesMaterials will be made available on the electronic learning platform: www.vwl.ethz.ch
LiteratureMaterials will be made available on the electronic learning platform: www.vwl.ethz.ch
Prerequisites / NoticeVarious lectures from different disciplines.
363-0532-00LEconomics of Sustainable DevelopmentW3 credits2VL. Bretschger
AbstractConcepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability;
neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources; pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve; sustainability policy.
ObjectiveThe aim is to develop an understanding of the implications of sustainable development for the long-run development of economies. It is to be shown to which extent the potential for growth to be sustainable depends on substitution possibilities, technological change and environmental policy.
After successful completion of this course, students are able to
1. understand the causes of long-term economic development
2. analyse the influence of natural resources and pollution on the development of social welfare
3. to appropriately classify the role of politics in the pursuit of sustainability goals.
ContentThe lecture introduces different concepts and paradigms of sustainable development. Building on this foundation and following a general introduction to the modelling of economic growth, conditions for growth to be sustainable in the presence of pollution and scarce natural resources are derived. Special attention is devoted to the scope for substitution and role of technological progress in overcoming resource scarcities. Implications of environmental externalities are regarded with respect to the design of environmental policies.
Concepts and indicators of sustainable development, paradigms of weak and strong sustainability, sustainability optimism vs. pessimism;
introduction to neoclassical and endogenous growth models;
pollution, environmental policy and growth;
role of substitution possibilities and technological progress;
Environmental Kuznets Curve: concept, theory and empirical results;
economic growth in the presence of exhaustible and renewable resources, Hartwick rule, resource saving technological change.
Lecture notesWill be provided successively in the course of the semester.
LiteratureBretschger, F. (1999), Growth Theory and Sustainable Development, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Bretschger, L. (2004), Wachstumstheorie, Oldenbourg, 3. Auflage, München.

Bretschger, L. (2018), Greening Economy, Graying Society, CER-ETH Press, ETH Zurich.

Perman, R., Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common (2011), Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Longman , 4th ed., Essex.

Neumayer, E. (2003), Weak and Strong Sustainability, 2nd ed., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
364-0576-00LAdvanced Sustainability Economics Information
PhD course, open for MSc students
W3 credits3GL. Bretschger
AbstractThe course covers current resource and sustainability economics, including ethical foundations of sustainability, intertemporal optimisation in capital-resource economies, sustainable use of non-renewable and renewable resources, pollution dynamics, population growth, and sectoral heterogeneity. A final part is on empirical contributions, e.g. the resource curse, energy prices, and the EKC.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the current issues and economic methods in sustainability research; ability to solve typical problems like the calculation of the growth rate under environmental restriction with the help of appropriate model equations.
351-0578-00LIntroduction to Economic Policy
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits2V
AbstractFirst approach to the theory of economic policy.
ObjectiveFirst approach to the theory of economic policy.
ContentWirtschaftspolitik ist die Gesamtheit aller Massnahmen von staatlichen Institutionen mit denen das Wirtschaftsgeschehen geregelt und gestaltet wird. Die Vorlesung bietet einen ersten Zugang zur Theorie der Wirtschaftspolitik.

Gliederung der Vorlesung:

1.) Wohlfahrtsökonomische Grundlagen: Wohlfahrtsfunktion, Pareto-Optimalität, Wirtschaftspolitik als Mittel-Zweck-Analyse u.a.

2.) Wirtschaftsordnungen: Geplante und ungeplante Ordnung
3.) Wettbewerb und Effizienz: Hauptsätze der Wohlfahrtsökonomik, Effizienz von Wettbewerbsmärkten
4.) Wettbewerbspolitik: Sicherstellung einer wettbewerblichen Ordnung

Gründe für Marktversagen:
5.) Externe Effekte
6.) Öffentliche Güter
7.) Natürliche Monopole
8.) Informationsasymmetrien
9.) Anpassungskosten
10.) Irrationalität

11.) Wirtschaftspolitik und Politische Ökonomie

Die Vorlesung beinhaltet Anwendungsbeispiele und Exkurse, um eine Verbindung zwischen Theorie und Praxis der Wirtschaftspolitik herzustellen. Z. B. Verteilungseffekte von wirtschaftspolitischen Massnahmen, Kartellpolitik am Ölmarkt, Internalisierung externer Effekte durch Emissionshandel, moralisches Risiko am Finanzmarkt, Nudging, zeitinkonsistente Präferenzen im Bereich der Gesundheitspolitik
Lecture notesNein.
701-0758-00LEcological Economics: Introduction with Focus on Growth CriticsW2 credits2VI. Seidl
AbstractStudents become acquainted with the basics / central questions / analyses of Ecological Economics. Thereby, central will be the topic of economic growth. What are the positions of Ecological Economics in this regard? What are the theories and concepts to found this position in general and in particular economic areas (e.g. resource consumption, efficiency, consumption, labour market, enterprises)?
ObjectiveBecome acquainted with basics and central questions of Ecological Economics (EE): e.g. 'pre-analytic vision', field of discipline, development EE, contributions of involved disciplines such as ecology or political sciences, ecological-economic analysis of topics such as labour market, consumption, money. Critical analysis of growth and learning about approaches to reduce growth pressures.
ContentWhat is Ecological Economics
Field of the discipline and basics
Resource consumption, its development and measurements
Measurement of economic activity and welfare
Economic growth, growth critics and post-growth society
Consumption, Money, Enterprises, labour market and growth pressures
Starting points for a post-growth society
Lecture notesNo Script. Slides and texts will be provided beforehand.
LiteratureDaly, H. E. / Farley, J. (2004). Ecological Economics. Principles and Applications. Washington, Island Press.

Seidl, I. /Zahrnt A. (2010). Postwachstumsgesellschaft, Marburg, Metropolis.

Ausgewählte wissenschaftliche Artikel.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in a lecture on environmental economics or otherwise basic knowledge of economics (e.g. A-Level)
751-1500-00LDevelopment EconomicsW3 credits2VI. Günther, K. Harttgen
AbstractIntroduction into basic theoretical and empirical aspects of economic development. Prescriptive theory of economic policy for poverty reduction.
ObjectiveThe goal of this lecture is to introduce students to basic development economics and related economic and developmental contexts.
ContentThe course begins with a theoretical and empirical introduction to the concepts of poverty reduction and issues of combating socioeconomic inequality. Based on this, important external and internal drivers of economic development and poverty reduction are discussed as well as economic and development policies to overcome global poverty. In particular, the following topics are discussed:

- measurement of development, poverty and inequality,
- growth theories
- trade and development
- education, health, population and development
- states and institutions
- fiscal,monetary- and exchange rate policies
Lecture notesNone.
LiteratureGünther, Harttgen und Michaelowa (2020): Einführung in die Entwicklungsökonomik.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen:
Grundlagenkenntisse der Mikro- und Makroökonomie.

Besonderes:
Die Veranstaltung besteht aus einem Vorlesungsteil, aus eigener Literatur- und Recherchearbeit sowie der Bearbeitung von Aufgabenblättern.

Die Vorlesung basiert auf: Günther, Harttgen und Michaelowa (2019): Einführung in die Entwicklungsökonomik. Einzelne Kapitel müssen jeweils vor den Veranstaltungen gelesen werden. In den Veranstaltungen wird das Gelesene diskutiert und angewendet. Auch werden offene Fragen der Kapitel und Übungen besprochen.
860-0032-00LPrinciples of Macroeconomics Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: An introductory course in Economics is required to sign up for this course.

Number of participants is limited to 20

STP students have priority
W3 credits2VS. Sarferaz
AbstractThis course examines the behaviour of macroeconomic variables, such as gross domestic product, unemployment and inflation rates. It tries to answer questions like: How can we explain fluctuations of national economic activity? What can economic policy do against unemployment and inflation?
ObjectiveThis lecture will introduce the fundamentals of macroeconomic theory and explain their relevance to every-day economic problems.
ContentThis course helps you understand the world in which you live. There are many questions about the macroeconomy that might spark your curiosity. Why are living standards so meagre in many African countries? Why do some countries have high rates of inflation while others have stable prices? Why have some European countries adopted a common currency? These are just a few of the questions that this course will help you answer. Furthermore, this course will give you a better understanding of the potential and limits of economic policy. As a voter, you help choose the policies that guide the allocation of society's resources. When deciding which policies to support, you may find yourself asking various questions about economics. What are the burdens associated with alternative forms of taxation? What are the effects of free trade with other countries? How does the government budget deficit affect the economy? These and similar questions are always on the minds of policy makers.
701-0701-00LPhilosophy of ScienceW3 credits2VC. J. Baumberger
AbstractThe lecture explores various strands in philosophy of science in a critical way, focusing on the notion of rationality in science, especially with regards to environmental research. It addresses the significance and limits of empirical, mathematical and logical methods, as well as problems and ethical issues raised by the use of science in society.
ObjectiveStudents learn to engage with problems in the philosophy of science and to relate them to natural and environmental sciences, thus developing their skills in critical thinking about science and its use. They know the most important positions in philosophy of science and the objections they face. They can identify, structure and discuss issues raised by the use of science in society.
Content1. Core differences between classical Greek and modern conceptions of science.
2. Classic positions in the philosophy of science in the 20th century: logical empiricism and critical rationalism (Popper); the analysis of scientific concepts and explanations.
3. Objections to logical empiricism and critical rationalism, and further developments: What is the difference between the natural sciences, the social sciences and the arts and humanities? What is progress in science (Kuhn, Fleck, Feyerabend)? Is scientific knowledge relativistic? What is the role of experiments and computer simulations?
4. Issues raised by the use of science in society: The relation between basic and applied research; inter- and transdisciplinarity; ethics and accountability of science.
Lecture notesA reader will be available for students.
LiteratureA list of introductory literature and handbooks will be distributed to the students.
Prerequisites / NoticeOral examination during the session examination.
Further optional exercises accompany the lecture and offer the opportunity for an in-depth discussion of selected texts from the reader. Students receive an additional credit point. They have to sign up separately for the exercises for the course 701-0701-01 U.
851-0125-65LA Sampler of Histories and Philosophies of Mathematics
Particularly suitable for students D-CHAB, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MATH, D-PHYS
W3 credits2VR. Wagner
AbstractThis course will review several case studies from the ancient, medieval and modern history of mathematics. The case studies will be analyzed from various philosophical perspectives, while situating them in their historical and cultural contexts.
ObjectiveThe course aims are:
1. To introduce students to the historicity of mathematics
2. To make sense of mathematical practices that appear unreasonable from a contemporary point of view
3. To develop critical reflection concerning the nature of mathematical objects
4. To introduce various theoretical approaches to the philosophy and history of mathematics
5. To open the students' horizons to the plurality of mathematical cultures and practices
851-0090-00LThe Philosophy of Complex Systems Restricted registration - show details W3 credits2SO. Del Fabbro
AbstractToday complexity research has found an enormous expansiveness in heterogenous areas, such as physics, biology, medicine, urban complexity, environment sustainability, public policy, economics, sociology, education, computer science, robotics, AI, etc. Furthermore, we will look at historical advancements like cybernetics, and how complexity research influenced philosophical theories.
ObjectiveStudents should learn about the different types of argumentative texts and scientific theories. They should learn to understand the descriptive and critical value of texts that operate at the boarder between philosophy and science.
860-0001-00LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.

Priority for MSc Science, Technology, and Policy.
W3 credits2.8GT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractStudents acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard.
ObjectivePublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
Lecture notesReading materials will be distributed electronically to the students when the semester starts.
LiteratureBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a Master level course. The course is capped at 25 students, with ISTP Master students having priority.
851-0252-01LHuman-Computer Interaction: Cognition and Usability Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET
W3 credits2SC. Hölscher, I. Barisic, H. Zhao
AbstractThis seminar introduces theory and methods in human-computer interaction and usability. Cognitive Science provides a theoretical framework for designing user interfaces as well as a range of methods for assessing usability (user testing, cognitive walkthrough, GOMS). The seminar will provide an opportunity to experience some of the methods in applied group projects.
ObjectiveThis seminar will introduce key topics, theories and methodology in human-computer interaction (HCI) and usability. Presentations will cover the basics of human-computer interaction and selected topics like mobile interaction, adaptive systems, human error and attention. A focus of the seminar will be on getting to know evaluation techniques in HCI. Students will work in groups and will first familiarize themselves with a select usability evaluation method (e.g. user testing, GOMS, task analysis, heuristic evaluation, questionnaires or Cognitive Walkthrough). They will then apply the methods to a human-computer interaction setting (e.g. an existing software or hardware interface) and present the method as well as their procedure and results to the plenary. Active participation is vital for the success of the seminar, and students are expected to contribute to presentations of foundational themes, methods and results of their chosen group project. In order to obtain course credit a written essay / report will be required (details to be specified in the introductory session of the course).
851-0232-00LSocial Psychology of Effective TeamworkW2 credits2VR. Mutz
AbstractThe lecture covers the main topics of social interactions in groups as a basis for effective teamwork in organisations: group; group structure; group dynamics and performance; group analysis; examples of applications.
ObjectiveTeamwork is of growing importance in business and administration. The aim of this lecture / exercise is to provide a scientific understanding of social interactions in groups as a basis for effective teamwork in organisations.
ContentInhalte der Lehrveranstaltung sind:
- Gruppe: Definition und Typen
- Gruppenstruktur: Rollen und Führung
- Gruppenprozesse: Konformität und Konflikte in Gruppen
- Gruppenleistung: Leistungsvorteile von Gruppen
- Gruppenanalyse: Interaktionsprozessanalyse und Soziometrie
- Anwendungsbeispiele: Assessment-Center, teilautonome Gruppen
Lecture notesEs können Folien, die in der Vorlesung verwendet werden, im Anschluss an die Veranstaltung von einer Austauchplattform heruntergeladen werden.
LiteratureDie Literatur wird in Form eines Readers mit für die Themen der Vorlesung relevanten Textauszügen aus Fachbüchern angeboten.
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Übungen dienen dazu, einzelne Themenbereiche der Vorlesung an praktischen Beispielen exemplarisch zu vertiefen.
851-0252-08LEvidence-Based Design: Methods and Tools For Evaluating Architectural Design Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH
W3 credits2SM. Gath Morad, B. Emo Nax, C. Hölscher
AbstractStudents are taught a variety of evaluation methods to assess architectural design from the perspective of potential occupants. Students are given a theoretical background on evaluation in architecture as well as practical knowledge on evaluation methods such as virtual reality, agent-based simulations and space syntax analysis. This is a project-oriented course tailored for architecture students.
ObjectiveThe course aims to teach students how to evaluate architectural design projects from the perspective of potential occupants. The concept of evidence-based design is introduced through a design process applied to a specific case study. Students are given a theoretical background on the notion of evaluation in architecture and spatial cognition as well as practical knowledge on various evaluation methods such as virtual reality, agent-based simulations and space syntax analysis. The course covers a range of methods including virtual reality for architectural design and agent-based simulations as well as visibility analysis and network analysis. Students are expected to apply these methods to a case study of their choice or to example cases provided by the course team. For students taking a B-ARCH or M-ARCH degree, this can be a completed or ongoing design studio project. The course gives students the chance to implement the methods iteratively and explore how best to address the needs of the potential occupants during the design process.

The course is tailored for students studying for B-ARCH and M-ARCH degrees. As an alternative to obtaining D-GESS credit, architecture students can obtain course credit in "Vertiefungsfach" or "Wahlfach".
851-0740-00LBig Data, Law, and Policy Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 35

Students will be informed by 1.3.2020 at the latest.
W3 credits2SS. Bechtold
AbstractThis course introduces students to societal perspectives on the big data revolution. Discussing important contributions from machine learning and data science, the course explores their legal, economic, ethical, and political implications in the past, present, and future.
ObjectiveThis course is intended both for students of machine learning and data science who want to reflect on the societal implications of their field, and for students from other disciplines who want to explore the societal impact of data sciences. The course will first discuss some of the methodological foundations of machine learning, followed by a discussion of research papers and real-world applications where big data and societal values may clash. Potential topics include the implications of big data for privacy, liability, insurance, health systems, voting, and democratic institutions, as well as the use of predictive algorithms for price discrimination and the criminal justice system. Guest speakers, weekly readings and reaction papers ensure a lively debate among participants from various backgrounds.
851-0702-01LPublic Construction Law
Particularly suitable for students of D-BAUG
W2 credits2VO. Bucher
AbstractStudents will be introduced to the basic principles of planning and public construction legislation (development application procedures) as well as to the basics of public procurement law.
ObjectiveStudents shall have an understanding for the basic principles of planning and public construction legislation (incl. environmental law, development application procedures) as well as for the basics of public procurement law.
ContentTopics of this unit are: 1. Fundamentals of planning and public construction legislation (development, constitutional and legal foundation, basic principles and aims of spatial planning), 2. Federal, cantonal and communal planning legislation, 3. Public construction law (accessibility, zoning, construction and land use regulations [incl. environmental, water, heritage and energy use law], 4. Development application proceedings (obtaining development consent, appeal proceedings), 5. Basics of public procurement law
Lecture notesALAIN GRIFFEL, Raumplanungs- und Baurecht - in a nutshell, Dike Verlag, 3. A., Zürich 2017

CLAUDIA SCHNEIDER HEUSI, Vergaberecht - in a nutshell, Dike Verlag, 2. A., Zürich 2018

Die Vorlesung basiert auf diesen Lehrmitteln.
LiteraturePETER HÄNNI, Planungs-, Bau- und besonderes Umweltschutzrecht, 6. A., Bern 2016

WALTER HALLER/PETER KARLEN, Raumplanungs-, Bau- und Umweltrecht, Bd. I, 3. A., Zürich 1999
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen: Vorlesung Rechtslehre GZ (851-0703-00/01)
851-0735-11LEnvironmental Regulation: Law and Policy Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20.

Particularly suitable for students of D-USYS
W3 credits1SJ. van Zeben
AbstractThe aim of this course is to make students with a technical scientific background aware of the legal and political context of environmental policy in order to place technical solutions in their regulatory context.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to equip students with a legal and regulatory skill-set that allows them to translate their technical knowledge into a policy brief directed at legally trained regulators. More generally, it aims to inform students with a technical scientific background of the legal and political context of environmental policy. The focus of the course will be on international and European issues and regulatory frameworks - where relevant, the position of Switzerland within these international networks will also be discussed.
ContentTopics covered in lectures:

(1) Environmental Regulation
a. Perspectives
b. Regulatory Challenges of Environment Problems
c. Regulatory Tools
(2) Law: International, European and national laws
a. International law
b. European law
c. National law
(3) Policy: Case studies

Assessment:
(i) Class participation (25%): Students will be expected to contribute to class discussions and prepare short memos on class readings.
(ii) Exam (75%) consisting of two parts:
a. Policy brief - a maximum of 2 pages (including graphs and tables);
b. Background document to the policy brief - this document sets out a more detailed and academic overview of the topic (maximum 8 pages including graphs and tables);
Lecture notesThe course is taught as a small interactive seminar and significant participation is expected from the students. Participation will be capped at 15 in order to maintain the interactive nature of the classes. All classes, readings, and assignments, are in English.

Teaching will take place over two weeks in February and March. The exam date will be in May.

During the second week of the teaching period, students will have individual 30-minute meetings with the lecturer to discuss their project.
LiteratureAn electronic copy of relevant readings will be provided to the students at no cost before the start of the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo specific pre-existing legal knowledge is required, however all students must have successfully completed Grundzüge des Rechts (851-0708-00 V) or an equivalent course.

The course is (inter)related to materials discussed in Politikwissenschaft: Grundlagen (851-0577-00 V), Ressourcen- und Umweltökonomie (751-1551-00 V), Umweltrecht: Konzepte und Rechtsgebiete (851-0705-01 V), Rechtlicher Umgang mit natürlichen Ressourcen (701-0743-01 V), Environmental Governance (701-1651-00 G), Policy and Economics of Ecosystem Services (701-1653-00 G), International Environmental Politics: Part I (851-0594-00 V).
851-0585-38LData Science in Techno-Socio-Economic Systems Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 80

This course is thought be for students in the 5th semester or above with quantitative skills and interests in modeling and computer simulations.

Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D-MTEC, D-PHYS
W3 credits3SN. Antulov-Fantulin
AbstractThis course introduces how techno-socio-economic systems in our complex society can be better understood with techniques and tools of data science. Students shall learn how the fundamentals of data science are used to give insights into the research of complexity science, computational social science, economics, finance, and others.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to qualify students with knowledge on data science to better understand techno-socio-economic systems in our complex societies. This course aims to make students capable of applying the most appropriate and effective techniques of data science under different application scenarios. The course aims to engage students in exciting state-of-the-art scientific tools, methods and techniques of data science.
In particular, lectures will be divided into research talks and tutorials. The course shall increase the awareness level of students of the importance of interdisciplinary research. Finally, students have the opportunity to develop their own data science skills based on a data challenge task, they have to solve, deliver and present at the end of the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeGood programming skills and a good understanding of probability & statistics and calculus are expected.
701-0786-00LMediation in Environmental Planning: Theory and Case Studies.W2 credits2GK. Siegwart
AbstractThis course is intended to demonstrate how environmental decisions can be optimized and conflicts better dealt by using mediation. Case studies will focus on construction of windmills for electricity purpose, use of fracking, sustainable city-planning in the field of former industrial area or the establishment of a birds- or a forest-management plan.
Objective- Develop comprehension of legal and social responses to environmental conflicts
- Recognize the most important participative techniques and their ranges
- Develop concepts for doing and evaluating mediation processes
- Estimate the potential and limitations of cooperative environmental planning
- Train communicative skills (presentation, moderation, discussion design, negotiation), especially by participating at a mediation
ContentTo this end, we will look at the most important techniques of mediation and put them into the context of today's legislation, participation and conflict culture. The potential and limitations of the individual techniques will be discussed using current Swiss and international case studies, namely in the field of windenergy. Students can do conflict analyses, for instance, as part of individual and group analyses and a half-day mediation-simulation, develop technique concepts and train their own communicative and negotiation skills.
Lecture notesA reader will be handed out.
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
066-0434-00LMaster's Thesis Restricted registration - show details
Only students who fulfill the following criteria are allowed to begin with their master thesis:
a. successful completion of the bachelor programme;
b. fulfilling of any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the master programme.

Master thesis are supervised and reviewed by one or several professors and possibly by other persons at the same time. At least one professor has to be a member of a department involved in the study programme (article 2). This regulation is also valid for master thesis taking place outside ETH Zurich.
O30 credits40DProfessors
AbstractA 6-months Master thesis completes the Master's program of Integrated Building Systems. With the thesis project students are expected to demonstrate their ability to independent and structured scientific thinking.
ObjectiveA 6-months Master thesis completes the Master's program of Integrated Building Systems. With the thesis project students are expected to demonstrate their ability to independent and structured scientific thinking.
ContentA 6-months Master thesis completes the Master's program of Integrated Building Systems. With the thesis project students are expected to demonstrate their ability to independent and structured scientific thinking. The thesis can be performed either at ETH Zurich, an industrial enterprise, or in a research institution, but has to be advised by one or more professors affiliated with the Master program "Integrated building systems".
The responsible supervisor defines the topic in consultation with the student, together with the scope of work, criteria of assessment, and dates of beginning and delivery of the work.
Prerequisites / NoticeOnly students who fulfil the following criteria are allowed to enrol for their master thesis:
a. successful completion of the bachelor program;
b. any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the master program MBS have been successfully completed;
c. successful completion of all courses from the categories (fundamental, core and project courses and the semester project). Courses from categories "GESS" and "Specialized" can still be completed during the master thesis project.

The 6 months thesis can be performed either at ETH Zurich, an industrial enterprise or in a research institution, but has to be advised by one or more professors affiliated with the Master program "Integrated building systems".

The thesis-supervisor defines the topic together with the student. Before the start of the thesis the topic must be approved by the tutor.

Registration in mystudies required!
Course Units for Additional Admission Requirements
The courses below are only available for MSc students with additional admission requirements.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0414-AALTransport Planning (Transportation I)
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
E-3 credits6RK. W. Axhausen
AbstractThe lecture course discusses the basic concepts, approaches and methods of transport planning in both their theoretical and practical contexts.
ObjectiveThe course introduces the basic theories and methods of transport planning.
ContentBasic theoretical links between transport, space and economic development; basic terminology; measurement and observation of travel behaviour; methods of the four stage approach; cost-benefit analysis.
LiteratureOrtuzar, J. de D. and L. Willumsen (2011) Modelling Transport, Wiley, Chichester.