From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence. Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2016

Computational Science and Engineering Bachelor Information
First Year Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-0232-10LAnalysis IIO8 credits4V + 2UA. Iozzi
AbstractIntroduction to differential calculus and integration in several variables.
Objective
ContentIntegration in several variables. More on differential equations. Differential calculus of several variables: maxima and minima, implicit function theorem. Vector calculus: line and surface integrals, the theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes. Applications.
Lecture notesChristian Blatter: Ingenieur-Analysis (Kapitel 4-6)
401-0302-10LComplex AnalysisO4 credits3V + 1UT. Bühler
AbstractBasics of complex analysis in theory and applications, in particular the global properties of analytic functions. Introduction to the integral transforms and description of some applications
ObjectiveErwerb von einigen grundlegenden Werkzeuge der komplexen Analysis.
ContentExamples of analytic functions, Cauchy‘s theorem, Taylor and Laurent series, singularities of analytic functions, residues. Fourier series and Fourier integral, Laplace transform.
LiteratureM. Ablowitz, A. Fokas: "Complex variables: introduction and applications", Cambridge Text in Applied Mathematics, Cambridge University Press 1997

E. Kreyszig: "Advanced Engineering Analysis", Wiley 1999

J. Brown, R. Churchill: "Complex Analysis and Applications", McGraw-Hill 1995

J. Marsden, M. Hoffman: "Basic complex analysis", W. H. Freeman 1999

P. P. G. Dyke: "An Introduction to Laplace Transforms and Fourier Series", Springer 2004

Ch. Blatter: "Komplexe Analysis, Fourier- und Laplace-Transformation", Autographie

A. Oppenheim, A. Willsky: "Signals & Systems", Prentice Hall 1997

M. Spiegel: "Laplace Transforms", Schaum's Outlines, Mc Graw Hill
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Analysis I and II
252-0002-00LData Structures and Algorithms Information O7 credits4V + 2UP. Widmayer
AbstractThis course is about fundamental algorithm design paradigms (such as induction, divide-and-conquer, backtracking, dynamic programming), classic algorithmic problems (such as sorting and searching), and data structures (such as lists, hashing, search trees). The connection between algorithms and data structures is explained for geometric and graph problems.
ObjectiveAn understanding of the design and analysis of fundamental algorithms and data structures.
ContentEs werden grundlegende Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen vorgestellt und analysiert. Dazu gehören auf der einen Seite Entwurfsmuster für Algorithmen, wie Induktion, divide-and-conquer, backtracking und dynamische Optimierung, ebenso wie klassische algorithmische Probleme, wie Suchen und Sortieren. Auf der anderen Seite werden Datenstrukturen für verschiedene Zwecke behandelt, darunter verkettete Listen, Hashtabellen, balancierte Suchbäume, verschiedene heaps und union-find-Strukturen. Weiterhin wird Adaptivität bei Datenstrukturen (wie etwa Splay-Bäume) und bei Algorithmen (wie etwa online-Algorithmen) beleuchtet. Das Zusammenspiel von Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen wird anhand von Geometrie- und Graphenproblemen illustriert.
LiteratureTh. Ottmann, P.Widmayer: Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen, Spektrum-Verlag, 5. Auflage, Heidelberg, Berlin, Oxford, 2011
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzung:
252-0021-00L Einführung in die Programmierung
402-0040-00LPhysics IO5 credits4V + 2UY. M. Acremann, D. Pescia
AbstractPart A:
Introduction to mechanics, wave phenomena, Kelpler problem, rotational motion.
Part B: electrostatics of metals and isolators, magnetostatics, Maxwell equations.
ObjectiveFundamentals of mechanics, oscillations, waves, electrostatics and magnetostatics.
ContentPart A:
Introduction to mechanics, wave phenomena, Kelpler problem, rotational motion.
Part B: electrostatics of metals and isolators, magnetostatics, Maxwell equations.
Lecture notesA copy of the blackboard is made available online.
Literature(Fakultativ):
Teil A: W. Nolting, "Klassische Mechanik", Springer Verlag, Berlin, 2011.
Teil B: W. Nolting, "Elektrodynamik", Springer Verlag, Berlin, 2011
529-4000-00LChemistry Restricted registration - show details O4 credits3GE. C. Meister
AbstractIntroduction to chemistry with aspects of inorganic, organic and physical chemistry.
Objective- Understanding of simple models of chemical bonding, three-dimensional molecular structure and molecular chirality
- Quantitative description of selected chemical systems by means of reaction equations and equilibria
- Understanding of fundamental concepts of chemical kinetics (e.g. reaction order, rate law, rate constant)
ContentChemical bond and molecular structure (VSEPR), reactions, equilibria, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics.
LiteratureC.E. Housecroft, E.C. Constable, Chemistry. An Introduction to Organic, Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Pearson: Harlow 2010
C.E. Mortimer, U. Müller, Chemie, 10. Auflage, Thieme: Stuttgart 2010
Basic Courses
Block G1
All course units within Block G1 are offered in the autumn semester.
Block G2
All course units within Block G2 are offered in the autumn semester.
Block G3
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-0674-00LNumerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
Not meant for BSc/MSc students of mathematics.
O8 credits4V + 2U + 1AR. Hiptmair
AbstractDerivation, properties, and implementation of fundamental numerical methods for a few key partial differential equations: convection-diffusion, heat equation, wave equation, conservation laws. Implementation in Python in one dimension and in C++ in 2D.
ObjectiveMain skills to be acquired in this course:
* Ability to implement advanced numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations efficiently
* Ability to modify and adapt numerical algorithms guided by awareness of their mathematical foundations
* Ability to select and assess numerical methods in light of the predictions of theory
* Ability to identify features of a PDE (= partial differential equation) based model that are relevant for the selection and performance of a numerical algorithm
* Ability to understand research publications on theoretical and practical aspects of numerical methods for partial differential equations.
* Skills in the efficient implementation of finite element methods on unstructured meshes.

This course is neither a course on the mathematical foundations and numerical analysis of methods nor an course that merely teaches recipes and how to apply software packages.
Content1 Case Study: A Two-point Boundary Value Problem
1.1 Introduction
1.2 A model problem
1.3 Variational approach
1.4 Simplified model
1.5 Discretization
1.5.1 Galerkin discretization
1.5.2 Collocation [optional]
1.5.3 Finite differences
1.6 Convergence
2 Second-order Scalar Elliptic Boundary Value Problems
2.1 Equilibrium models
2.1.1 Taut membrane
2.1.2 Electrostatic fields
2.1.3 Quadratic minimization problems
2.2 Sobolev spaces
2.3 Variational formulations
2.4 Equilibrium models: Boundary value problems
3 Finite Element Methods (FEM)
3.1 Galerkin discretization
3.2 Case study: Triangular linear FEM in two dimensions
3.3 Building blocks of general FEM
3.4 Lagrangian FEM
3.4.1 Simplicial Lagrangian FEM
3.4.2 Tensor-product Lagrangian FEM
3.5 Implementation of FEM in C++
3.5.1 Mesh file format (Gmsh)
3.5.2 Mesh data structures (DUNE)
3.5.3 Assembly
3.5.4 Local computations and quadrature
3.5.5 Incorporation of essential boundary conditions
3.6 Parametric finite elements
3.6.1 Affine equivalence
3.6.2 Example: Quadrilaterial Lagrangian finite elements
3.6.3 Transformation techniques
3.6.4 Boundary approximation
3.7 Linearization [optional]
4 Finite Differences (FD) and Finite Volume Methods (FV) [optional]
4.1 Finite differences
4.2 Finite volume methods (FVM)
5 Convergence and Accuracy
5.1 Galerkin error estimates
5.2 Empirical Convergence of FEM
5.3 Finite element error estimates
5.4 Elliptic regularity theory
5.5 Variational crimes
5.6 Duality techniques [optional]
5.7 Discrete maximum principle [optional]
6 2nd-Order Linear Evolution Problems
6.1 Parabolic initial-boundary value problems
6.1.1 Heat equation
6.1.2 Spatial variational formulation
6.1.3 Method of lines
6.1.4 Timestepping
6.1.5 Convergence
6.2 Wave equations [optional]
6.2.1 Vibrating membrane
6.2.2 Wave propagation
6.2.3 Method of lines
6.2.4 Timestepping
6.2.5 CFL-condition
7 Convection-Diffusion Problems
7.1 Heat conduction in a fluid
7.1.1 Modelling fluid flow
7.1.2 Heat convection and diffusion
7.1.3 Incompressible fluids
7.1.4 Transient heat conduction
7.2 Stationary convection-diffusion problems
7.2.1 Singular perturbation
7.2.2 Upwinding
7.3 Transient convection-diffusion BVP
7.3.1 Method of lines
7.3.2 Transport equation
7.3.3 Lagrangian split-step method
7.3.4 Semi-Lagrangian method
8 Numerical Methods for Conservation Laws
8.1 Conservation laws: Examples
8.2 Scalar conservation laws in 1D
8.3 Conservative finite volume discretization
8.3.1 Semi-discrete conservation form
8.3.2 Discrete conservation property
8.3.3 Numerical flux functions
8.3.4 Montone schemes
8.4 Timestepping
8.4.1 Linear stability
8.4.2 CFL-condition
8.4.3 Convergence
8.5 Higher order conservative schemes [optional]
8.5.1 Slope limiting
8.5.2 MUSCL scheme
8.6. FV-schemes for systems of conservation laws [optional]
Lecture notesLecture documents and classroom notes will be made available to the audience as PDF.
LiteratureChapters of the following books provide SUPPLEMENTARY reading
(Detailed references in course material):

* D. Braess: Finite Elemente,
Theorie, schnelle Löser und Anwendungen in der Elastizitätstheorie, Springer 2007 (available online)
* S. Brenner and R. Scott. Mathematical theory of finite element methods, Springer 2008 (available online)
* A. Ern and J.-L. Guermond. Theory and Practice of Finite Elements, volume 159 of Applied
Mathematical Sciences. Springer, New York, 2004.
* Ch. Großmann and H.-G. Roos: Numerical Treatment of Partial Differential Equations, Springer 2007
* W. Hackbusch. Elliptic Differential Equations. Theory and Numerical Treatment, volume 18 of
Springer Series in Computational Mathematics. Springer, Berlin, 1992.
* P. Knabner and L. Angermann. Numerical Methods for Elliptic and Parabolic Partial Differential
Equations, volume 44 of Texts in Applied Mathematics. Springer, Heidelberg, 2003.
* S. Larsson and V. Thomée. Partial Differential Equations with Numerical Methods, volume 45 of
Texts in Applied Mathematics. Springer, Heidelberg, 2003.
* R. LeVeque. Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems. Cambridge Texts in Applied Mathematics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2002.

However, study of supplementary literature is not important for for following the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeMastery of basic calculus and linear algebra is taken for granted.
Familiarity with fundamental numerical methods (solution methods for linear systems of equations, interpolation, approximation, numerical quadrature, numerical integration of ODEs) is essential.

Important: Coding skills in MATLAB and C++ are essential.

Homework asssignments involve substantial coding, partly based on a C++ finite element library. The written examination will be computer based and will comprise coding tasks.
529-0431-00LPhysical Chemistry III: Molecular Quantum Mechanics Restricted registration - show details O4 credits4GB. H. Meier, M. Ernst
AbstractPostulates of quantum mechanics, operator algebra, Schrödinger's equation, state functions and expectation values, matrix representation of operators, particle in a box, tunneling, harmonic oscillator, molecular vibrations, angular momentum and spin, generalised Pauli principle, perturbation theory, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, Born-Oppenheimer approximation.
ObjectiveThis is an introductory course in quantum mechanics. The course starts with an overview of the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics and introduces the mathematical formalism. The postulates and theorems of quantum mechanics are discussed in the context of experimental and numerical determination of physical quantities. The course develops the tools necessary for the understanding and calculation of elementary quantum phenomena in atoms and molecules.
ContentPostulates and theorems of quantum mechanics: operator algebra, Schrödinger's equation, state functions and expectation values. Linear motions: free particles, particle in a box, quantum mechanical tunneling, the harmonic oscillator and molecular vibrations. Angular momentum: electronic spin and orbital motion, molecular rotations. Electronic structure of atoms and molecules: the Pauli principle, angular momentum coupling, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Variational principle and perturbation theory. Discussion of bigger systems (solids, nano-structures).
Lecture notesA script written in German will be distributed. The script is, however, no replacement for personal notes during the lecture and does not cover all aspects discussed.
227-0014-00LComputer Engineering II Information Restricted registration - show details O4 credits2V + 2UR. Wattenhofer
AbstractWe learn the important functions of operating systems. Networking: IP, routing, transport, flows, applications, sockets, link and physical layer, Markov chains, PageRank, security. Storage: memory hierarchy, file systems, caching, hashing, data bases. Computation: virtualization, processes, threads, concurrency, scheduling, locking, synchronization, mutual exclusion, deadlocks, consistency.
Objectivesee above
ContentComputers come in all shapes and sizes: servers, laptops, tablets, smartphones, smartwatches, all the way down to that tiny microcontroller in a washing machine. People buy a computer because (i) it gives them access to the Internet, (ii) it provides storage, and probably also because (iii) it computes. While having network access seems to be vital, advanced storage and computing capabilities more and more move to designated servers ("the cloud"). In this lecture, we learn how computers provide networking, storage, and computation by means of an operating system.

We start out with networking, and discuss the internet protocol, addressing, routing, transport layer protocols, flows, some representative application layer protocols, and how to implement these with sockets. We also discuss the link and physical layer, Markov chains and PageRank, and selected topics in security. Regarding storage, we talk about the memory hierarchy, file systems, caching, efficient data structures such as hashing, and data base principles. Concerning computation, we discuss the virtualization of the processing units with processes and threads. We focus on concurrency and examine scheduling, locking, synchronization, mutual exclusion, deadlocks, and consistency.

The lecture will use various teaching paradigms. The majority of the lecture will be based on blackboard discussions, supported by a script. Where appropriate we will also use slides or demonstrations. A few lectures will be flipped classroom style. The lecture will feature weekly paper exercises.

However, some of the course material is best learned in front of an actual computer. In addition to the lecture we offer exciting hands-on exercises in a lab environment.
Lecture notesAvailable
Block G4
Students that enrol for the second year in the CSE Bachelor Programme and whose first year examination did not involve the subject "Physics I" will instead of "Physics II" (402-0034-10L) take the "Physics I and II" (402-0043-00L and 402-0044-00L) courses with performance assessment as a yearly course.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0034-10LPhysics IIW4 credits2V + 2UW. Wegscheider
AbstractThis is a two-semester course introducing students into the foundations of Modern Physics. Topics include electricity and magnetism, light, waves, quantum physics, solid state physics, and semiconductors. Selected topics with important applications in industry will also be considered.
ObjectiveThe lecture is intended to promote critical, scientific thinking. Key concepts of Physics will be acquired, with a focus on technically relevant applications. At the end of the two semesters, students will have a good overview over the topics of classical and modern Physics.
ContentIntroduction into Quantum Physics, Absorption and Emission of Electromagnetic Radiation, Basics of Solid State Physics, Semiconductors
Lecture notesLecture notes will be available in German.
LiteraturePaul A. Tipler, Gene Mosca, Michael Basler und Renate Dohmen
Physik: für Wissenschaftler und Ingenieure
Spektrum Akademischer Verlag, 2009, 1636 Seiten, ca. 80 Euro.

Paul A. Tipler, Ralph A. Llewellyn
Moderne Physik
Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag, 2009, 982 Seiten, ca. 75 Euro.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo testat requirements for this lecture.
402-0044-00LPhysics IIW4 credits3V + 1UM. R. Meyer
AbstractIntroduction to the concepts and tools in physics with the help of demonstration experiments: electromagnetism, optics, introduction to modern physics.
ObjectiveThe concepts and tools in physics, as well as the methods of an experimental science are taught. The student should learn to identify, communicate and solve physical problems in his/her own field of science.
ContentElectromagnetism (electric current, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations), Optics (light, geometrical optics, interference and diffraction), and Introduction to quantum physics
Lecture notesThe lecture follows the book "Physics for Scientists and Engineers" by Paul A. Tipler and Gene Mosca (6th edition).
LiteraturePhysics for Scientists and Engineers" by Paul A. Tipler and Gene Mosca (6th edition). There is also a similar book in German published by Spektrum Akademischer Verlag authored under the permission of Tipler and Mosca.
Prerequisites / NoticeFor the exam, a self-written summary sheet, hand-held calculator, and translation dictionary (to English).
151-0122-00LFluid Dynamics for CSEO5 credits3V + 1UT. Rösgen
AbstractAn introduction to the physical and mathematical foundations of fluid dynamics is given.
Topics include dimensional analysis, integral and differential conservation laws, inviscid and viscous flows, Navier-Stokes equations, boundary layers, turbulent pipe flow. Elementary solutions and examples are presented.
ObjectiveAn introduction to the physical and mathematical principles of fluid dynamics. Fundamental terminology/principles and their application to simple problems.
ContentPhenomena, applications, foundations
dimensional analysis and similitude; kinematic description; conservation laws (mass, momentum, energy), integral and differential formulation; inviscid flows: Euler equations, stream filament theory, Bernoulli equation; viscous flows: Navier-Stokes equations; boundary layers; turbulence
Lecture notesEine erweiterte Formelsammlung zur Vorlesung wird elektronisch zur Verfügung gestellt.
LiteratureRecommended book: Fluid Mechanics, Kundu & Cohen & Dowling, 6th ed., Academic Press / Elsevier (2015)
Prerequisites / NoticeLeistungskontrolle: Sessionsprüfung
Erlaubte Hilfsmittel:
Lehrbuch (freie Auswahl, keine Aufgabensammlung), Formelsammlung IFD, 8 Seiten (=4 Blätter) eigene Notizen, Taschenrechner; Schriftlich; Dauer 1.5 Stunden

Voraussetzungen: Physik, Analysis
529-0483-00LStatistical Physics and Computer SimulationO4 credits2V + 1UM. Reiher
AbstractPrinciples and applications of statistical mechanics and equilibrium molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulation, Stochastic dynamics.
Exercises using a MD simulation program to generate ensembles and subsequently calculate ensemble averages.
ObjectiveIntroduction to statistical mechanics with the aid of computer simulation, development of skills to carry out statistical mechanical calculations using computers and interpret the results.
ContentPrinciples and applications of statistical mechanics and equilibrium molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulation, Stochastic dynamics.
Exercises using a MD simulation program to generate ensembles and subsequently calculate ensemble averages.
Literaturewill be announced in the lecture
Prerequisites / NoticeSince the exercises on the computer do convey and test essentially different skills as those being conveyed during the lectures and tested at the oral exam, the results of a small programming project will be presented in a 10-minutes talk by Pairs of students who had been working on the project.

Additional information will be provided in the first lecture.
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-0686-00LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) for CSE Information O7 credits4G + 2PP. Koumoutsakos, D. Rossinelli
AbstractThis course focuses on programming methods and tools for parallel computing on multi and many-core architectures. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation including the implementation of relevant algorithms on HPC architectures.
Objective
252-0232-00LSoftware Design Information O6 credits2V + 1UD. Gruntz
AbstractThe course Software Design presents and discusses design patterns regularly used to solve problems in object oriented design and object oriented programming. The presented patterns are illustrated with examples from the Java libraries and are applied in a project.
ObjectiveThe students
- know the principles of object oriented programming and can apply these.
- know the most important object oriented design patterns.
- can apply design patterns to solve design problems.
- discover in a given design the use of design patterns.
ContentThis course makes an introduction to object oriented programming. As programming language Java is used. The focus of this course however is object oriented design, in particular design patterns. Design patterns are solutions to recurring design problems. The discussed patterns are illustrated with examples from the Java libraries and are applied in the context of a project.
Lecture notesno script
Literature- Gamma, Helm, Johnson, Vlissides; Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software; Addison-Wesley; 0-2016-3361-2
- Freeman, Freeman, Sierra; Head First Design Patterns, Head First Design Patterns; O'Reilly; 978-0596007126
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course Software Design is designed for students in the computational sciences program, but is open to students of all programs. The precondition is, that participants have knowledge in structured programming (e.g. with C, C++, or Fortran).
Fields of Specialization
Astrophysics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0394-00LTheoretical Astrophysics and CosmologyW10 credits4V + 2UL. M. Mayer, A. Refregier
AbstractThis is the second of a two course series which starts with "General Relativity" and continues in the spring with "Theoretical Astrophysics and Cosmology", where the focus will be on applying general relativity to cosmology as well as developing the modern theory of structure formation in a cold dark matter Universe.
Objective
ContentThe course will cover the following topics:
- Homogeneous cosmology
- Thermal history of the universe, recombination, baryogenesis and nucleosynthesis
- Dark matter and Dark Energy
- Inflation
- Perturbation theory: Relativistic and Newtonian
- Model of structure formation and initial conditions from Inflation
- Cosmic microwave background anisotropies
- Spherical collapse and galaxy formation
- Large scale structure and cosmological probes
LiteratureSuggested textbooks:
H.Mo, F. Van den Bosch, S. White: Galaxy Formation and Evolution
S. Carroll: Space-Time and Geometry: An Introduction to General Relativity
S. Dodelson: Modern Cosmology
Secondary textbooks:
S. Weinberg: Gravitation and Cosmology
V. Mukhanov: Physical Foundations of Cosmology
E. W. Kolb and M. S. Turner: The Early Universe
N. Straumann: General relativity with applications to astrophysics
A. Liddle and D. Lyth: Cosmological Inflation and Large Scale Structure
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of General Relativity is recommended.
Physics of the Atmosphere
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1216-00LNumerical Modelling of Weather and Climate Information W4 credits3GC. Schär, U. Lohmann
AbstractThe guiding principle of this lecture is that students can understand how weather and climate models are formulated from the governing physical principles and how they are used for climate and weather prediction purposes.
ObjectiveThe guiding principle of this lecture is that students can understand how weather and climate models are formulated from the governing physical principles and how they are used for climate and weather prediction purposes.
ContentThe course provides an introduction into the following themes: numerical methods (finite differences and spectral methods); adiabatic formulation of atmospheric models (vertical coordinates, hydrostatic approximation); parameterization of physical processes (e.g. clouds, convection, boundary layer, radiation); atmospheric data assimilation and weather prediction; predictability (chaos-theory, ensemble methods); climate models (coupled atmospheric, oceanic and biogeochemical models); climate prediction.

Hands-on experience with simple models will be acquired in the tutorials.
Lecture notesSlides and lecture notes will be made available at
Link
LiteratureList of literature will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: to follow this course, you need some basic background in numerical methods (e.g., "Numerische Methoden in der Umweltphysik", 701-0461-00L)
Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0474-00LQuantum ChemistryW6 credits3GM. Reiher
AbstractIntroduction into the basic concepts of electronic structure theory and into numerical methods of quantum chemistry. Exercise classes are designed to deepen the theory; practical case studies using quantum chemical software to provide a 'hands-on' expertise in applying these methods.
ObjectiveNowadays, chemical research can be carried out in silico, an intellectual achievement for which Pople and Kohn have been awarded the Nobel prize of the year 1998. This lecture shows how that has been accomplished. It works out the many-particle theory of many-electron systems (atoms and molecules) and discusses its implementation into computer programs. A complete picture of quantum chemistry shall be provided that will allow students to carry out such calculations on molecules (for accompanying experimental work in the wet lab or as a basis for further study of the theory).
ContentBasic concepts of many-particle quantum mechanics. Derivation of the many-electron theory for atoms and molecules; starting with the harmonic approximation for the nuclear problem and with Hartree-Fock theory for the electronic problem to Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory and configuration interaction and to coupled cluster and multi-configurational approaches. Density functional theory. Case studies using quantum mechanical software.
Lecture notesHand outs will be provided for each lecture (this script has been completely revised in spring 2014 anf has been supplemented by (computer) examples that continuously illustrate how the theory works).
LiteratureTextbooks on Quantum Chemistry:
F.L. Pilar, Elementary Quantum Chemistry, Dover Publications
I.N. Levine, Quantum Chemistry, Prentice Hall

Hartree-Fock in basis set representation:
A. Szabo and N. Ostlund, Modern Quantum Chemistry: Introduction to Advanced Electronic Structure Theory, McGraw-Hill

Textbooks on Computational Chemistry:
F. Jensen, Introduction to Computational Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons
C.J. Cramer, Essentials of Computational Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons
Prerequisites / Noticebasic knowledge in quantum mechanics (e.g. through course physical chemistry III - quantum mechanics) required
Fluid Dynamics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0208-00LComputational Methods for Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer ProblemsW4 credits2V + 2UP. Jenny
AbstractNumerical methods for the solution of flow, heat and mass transfer problems are presented and practised by analytical and computer solutions for simple examples.
Subjects: solution process, physical and mathematical models, basic equations, discretization methods, numerical solution of advection, diffusion and Poisson equations, turbulent flows.
ObjectiveKnowledge of and practical experience with important discretisation and solution methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics, Heat and Mass Transfer Problems
ContentAufbauend auf den Lehrveranstaltungen über Fluiddynamik, Thermodynamik, Computational Methods for Engineering Application I (empfehlenswertes Wahlfach, 4. Semester) und Informatik (Programmieren) werden numerische Methoden für Berechnungsaufgaben der Fluiddynamik, Energie- und Verfahrenstechnik dargestellt und an einfachen Beispielen geübt.

1. Einleitung
Uebersicht, Anwendungen
Problemlösungsprozess, Fehler
2. Rekapitulation der Grundgleichungen
Formulierung, Anfangs- und Randbedingungen
3. Numerische Diskretisierungsverfahren
Finite-Differenzen- und Finite-Volumen-Verfahren
Grundbegriffe: Konsistenz, Stabilität, Konvergenz
4. Lösung der grundlegenden Gleichungstypen
Wärmeleitungs/Diffusionsgleichung (parabolisch)
Poisson-Gleichung (elliptisch)
Advektionsgleichung/Wellengleichung (hyperbolisch)
und Advektions-Diffusions-Gleichung
5. Berechnung inkompressibler Strömungen
6. Berechnung turbulenter Strömungen
Lecture notesLecture notes are available (in German)
Literaturea list of references is supplied
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is crucial to actively solve the analytical and practical (programming) exercises.
Systems and Control
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0216-00LControl Systems II Information W6 credits4GR. Smith
AbstractIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ObjectiveIntroduction to basic and advanced concepts of modern feedback control.
ContentThis course is designed as a direct continuation of the course "Regelsysteme" (Control Systems). The primary goal is to further familiarize students with various dynamic phenomena and their implications for the analysis and design of feedback controllers. Simplifying assumptions on the underlying plant that were made in the course "Regelsysteme" are relaxed, and advanced concepts and techniques that allow the treatment of typical industrial control problems are presented. Topics include control of systems with multiple inputs and outputs, control of uncertain systems (robustness issues), limits of achievable performance, and controller implementation issues.
Lecture notesThe slides of the lecture are available to download
LiteratureSkogestad, Postlethwaite: Multivariable Feedback Control - Analysis and Design. Second Edition. John Wiley, 2005.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Control Systems or equivalent
Robotics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0854-00LAutonomous Mobile Robots Information W5 credits4GR. Siegwart, M. Chli, M. Rufli
AbstractThe objective of this course is to provide the basics required to develop autonomous mobile robots and systems. Main emphasis is put on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, envionmen perception, and probabilistic environment modeling, localizatoin, mapping and navigation. Theory will be deepened by exercises with small mobile robots and discussed accross application examples.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to provide the basics required to develop autonomous mobile robots and systems. Main emphasis is put on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, envionmen perception, and probabilistic environment modeling, localizatoin, mapping and navigation.
Lecture notesThis lecture is enhanced by around 30 small videos introducing the core topics, and multiple-choice questions for continuous self-evaluation. It is developed along the TORQUE (Tiny, Open-with-Restrictions courses focused on QUality and Effectiveness) concept, which is ETH's response to the popular MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) concept.
LiteratureThis lecture is based on the Textbook:
Introduction to Autonomous Mobile Robots
Roland Siegwart, Illah Nourbakhsh, Davide Scaramuzza, The MIT Press, Second Edition 2011, ISBN: 978-0262015356
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