From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence. Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2016

Chemical Engineering Bachelor Information
2. Semester
Compulsory Subjects First Year Examinations
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0012-02LGeneral Chemistry (Inorganic Chemistry) IIO4 credits3V + 1UH. Grützmacher, W. Uhlig
Abstract1) General definitions 2) The VSEPR model 3) Qualitative molecular orbital diagrams 4) Closest packing, metal structures 5) The Structures of metalloids
6) Structures of the non-metals 7) Synthesis of the elements 8) Reactivity of the elements 9) Ionic Compounds 10) Ions in Solution 11) Element hydrogen compounds 12) Element halogen compounds 13) Element oxygen compounds 14) Redox chemistry
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the fundamental principles of the structures, properties, and reactivities of the main group elements (groups 1,2 and 13 to 18).
ContentThe course is divided in 14 sections in which the fundamental phenomena of the chemistry of the main group elements are discussed: Part 1: Introduction in the periodical properties of the elements and general definitions. – Part 2: The VSEPR model – Part 3: Qualitative molecular orbital diagrams for simple inorganic molecules – Part 4: Closest packing and structures of metals. – Part 5: The Structures of semimetals (metalloids) of the main group elements – Part 6: Structures of the non-metals– Part 7: Synthesis of the elements. – Part 8: Reactivity of the elements. – Part 9: Ionic Compounds. – Part 10: Ions in Solution. – Part 11: Element hydrogen compounds. – Part 12: Element halogen compounds. – Part 13: Element oxygen compounds. – Part 14: Redox chemistry.
Lecture notesThe transparencies used in the course are accessible via the internet on Link
LiteratureJ. Huheey, E. Keiter, R. Keiter, Inorganic Chemistry, Principles and Reactivity, 4th edition, deGruyter, 2003.

C.E.Housecroft, E.C.Constable, Chemistry, 4th edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2010.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasis for the understanding of this lecture is the course Allgemeine Chemie 1.
529-0012-03LGeneral Chemistry (Organic Chemistry) IIO4 credits3V + 1UP. Chen, A. Bach
AbstractClassification of organic reactions, reactive intermediates: radicals, carbocations, carbanions, organic acids / bases, electronic substituent effects, electrophilic aromatic substitution, electrophilic addition to double bonds, HSAB concept, nucleophilic substitution at sp3 hybridized carbon centres (SN1/SN2 reactions), nucleophilic aromatic substitutions, eliminations.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of fundamental reactivity principles and the relationship between structure and reactivity. Knowledge of the most important raection types and of selected classes of compounds.
ContentClassification of organic reactions, reactive intermediates: radicals, carbocations, carbanions, organic acids / bases, electronic substituent effects, electrophilic aromatic substitution, electrophilic addition to double bonds, HSAB concept, nucleophilic substitution at sp3 hybridized carbon centres (SN1/SN2 reactions), nucleophilic aromatic substitutions, eliminations.
Lecture notespdf file available at the beginning of the course
Literature[1] P. Sykes, "Reaktionsmechanismen der Organischen Chemie", VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, Weinheim 1988.
[2] Carey/Sundberg, Advanced Organic Chemistry, Part A and B, 3rd ed., Plenum Press, New York, 1990/1991. Deutsch: Organische Chemie.
[3] Vollhardt/Schore, Organic Chemistry, 2th ed., Freeman, New York, 1994 Deutsche Fassung: Organische Chemie 1995, Verlag Chemie, Wein¬heim, 1324 S. Dazu: N. Schore, Arbeitsbuch zu Vollhardt, Organische Chemie, 2. Aufl. Verlag Chemie, Weinheim, 1995, ca 400 S.
[4] J. March, Advanced Organic Chemistry; Reactions, Mechanisms, and Structure, 5th ed., Wiley, New York, 1992.
[5] Streitwieser/Heathcock, Organische Chemie, 2. Auflage, Verlag Chemie, Weinheim, 1994.
[6] Streitwieser/Heathcock/Kosower, Introduction to Organic Chemistry, 4th ed., MacMillan Publishing Company, New York, 1992.
[7] P. Y. Bruice, Organische Chemie, 5. Auflage, Pearson Verlag, 2007.
529-0012-01LPhysical Chemistry I: Thermodynamics Information O4 credits3V + 1UF. Merkt
AbstractFoundations of chemical thermodynamics. The first, second and third law of thermodynamics: Thermodynamic temperature scale, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, the chemical potential. Solutions and mixtures, phase diagrams. Reaction thermodynamics: reaction parameters and equilibrium conditions, equilibrium constants. Thermodynamics of processes at surfaces and interfaces.
ObjectiveIntroduction to chemical thermodynamics
ContentThe first, second and third law of thermodynamics: empirical temperature and thermodynamic temperature scale, internal energy, entropy, thermal equilibrium. Models and standard states: ideal gases, ideal solutions and mixtures, real gases, real solutions and mixtures, activity, tables of standard thermodynamic quantities. Reaction thermodynamics: the chemical potential, reaction parameters and equilibrium conditions, equilibrium constants and their pressure and temperature dependence. Phase equilibria. Thermodynamics at surfaces and interfaces: Adsorption equilibria. Capillary forces. Adsorption isothermes.
Lecture notesIn preparation.
LiteratureA list of possible text books will be provides as separate documents in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen: Allgemeine Chemie I, Grundlagen der Mathematik
551-0016-00LBiology IIO2 credits2VM. Stoffel, E. Hafen
AbstractThe lecture course Biology II, together with the course Biology I of the previous winter semester, is a basic introductory course into biology for students of materials sciences, of chemistry and of chemical engineering.
ObjectiveThe objective of the lecture course Biology II is the understanding of form, function, and development of animals and of the basic underlying mechanisms.
ContentThe following numbers of chapters refer to the text-book "Biology" (Campbell & Reece, 7th edition, 2005) on which the course is based. Chapters 1-4 are a basic prerequisite. The sections "Structure of the Cell" (Chapters 5-10, 12, 17) and "General Genetics" (Chapters 13-16, 18, 46) are covered by the lecture Biology I.

1. Genomes, DNA Technology, Genetic Basis of Development

Chapter 19: Eukaryotic Genomes: Organization, Regulation, and Evolution
Chapter 20: DNA Technology and Genomics
Chapter 21: The Genetic Basis of Development

2. Form, Function, and Development of Animals I

Chapter 40: Basic Principles of Animal Form and Function
Chapter 41: Animal Nutrition
Chapter 44: Osmoregulation and Excretion
Chapter 47: Animal Development

3. Form, Function, and Develeopment of Animals II

Chapter 42: Circulation and Gas Exchange
Chapter 43: The Immune System
Chapter 45: Hormones and the Endocrine System
Chapter 48: Nervous Systems
Chapter 49: Sensory and Motor Mechanisms
Lecture notesThe course follows closely the recommended text-book. Additional handouts may be provided by the lecturers.
LiteratureThe following text-book is the basis for the courses Biology I and II:

„Biology“, Campbell and Reece, 7th Edition, 2005, Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, ISBN 0-8053-7166-4
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Lecture course Biology I of autumn semester
401-0272-00LMathematical Foundations I: Analysis BO3 credits2V + 1UT. Bühler
AbstractOrdinary differential equations as mathematical models to describe processes. Numerical, analytical and geometrical aspects of differential equations. More on multidimensional calculus: vector analysis.
ObjectiveIntroduction to calculus in one and several dimensions. Building simple models and analysing them mathematically.
ContentOrdinary differential equations as mathematical models to describe processes. Numerical, analytical and geometrical aspects of differential equations. More on multidimensional calculus: vector analysis.
Literature- D. W. Jordan, P. Smith: Mathematische Methoden für die Praxis, Spektrum Akademischer Verlag
- M. Akveld/R. Sperb: Analysis I, Analysis II (vdf)
- L. Papula: Mathematik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler Bde 1,2,3. (Vieweg)
401-0622-00LMathematical Foundations II: Linear Algebra and StatisticsO3 credits2V + 1UM. Dettling
AbstractSystems of linear equations; matrix algebra, determinants; vector spaces, norms and scalar products; linear maps, basis transformations; eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

Random variables and probability, discrete and continuous distribution models; expectation, variance, central limit theorem, parameter estimation; statistical hypothesis tests; confidence intervals; regression analysis.
ObjectiveA sound knowledge of mathematics is an essential prerequisite for a quantitative and computer-based approach to natural sciences. In an intensive two-semester course the most important basic concepts of mathematics, namely univariate and multivariate calculus, linear algebra and statistics are taught.
ContentSystems of linear equations; matrix algebra, determinants; vector spaces, norms and scalar products; linear maps, basis transformations; eigenvalues and eigenvectors. - Least squares fitting and regression models; random variables, statistical properties of least-squares estimators; tests, confidence and prediction intervals in regression models; residual analysis.
Lecture notesFor the part on Linear Algebra, there is a short script (in German) which summarizes the main concepts and results without examples. For a self-contained presentation, the book by Nipp and Stoffer should be used. For the part on Statistics there is a detailed script (in German) available which should be self-contained. The book by Stahel can be used for additional information.
LiteratureLinear Algebra: K. Nipp/D. Stoffer: "Lineare Algebra", vdf, 5th edition.
Statistics: W. Stahel, "Statistische Datenanalyse", Vieweg, 3rd edition.
Laboratory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0230-00LInorganic and Organic Chemistry I Restricted registration - show details
Enrolment only possible up to the beginning of the semester.
O8 credits12PJ. W. Bode
AbstractLaboratory Course in Inorganic and Organic Chemistry I
ObjectiveIntroduction into basic techniques used in the organic laboratory. Understanding organic reactions through experiments.
ContentPart I: Basic operations such as the isolation, purification and characterization of organic compounds: distillation, extraction, chromatography, crystallization, IR (UV/1H-NMR)-spectroscopy for the identification of the constituion of organic compounds.

Part II: Organic reactions: preparative chemistry. From simple, one-step to multistep syntheses. Both classic and modern reactions will be performed.

Part III: Preparation of a chiral, enantiomerically pure ligand for asymmetric catalysis (together with AOCP II)
Literature- R. K. Müller, R. Keese: "Grundoperationen der präparativen organischen Chemie"; J. Leonard, B. Lygo, G. Procter: "Praxis der Organischen Chemie" (Übersetzung herausgegeben von G. Dyker), VCH, Weinheim, 1996, ISBN 3-527-29411-2.
Prerequisites / NoticeVoraussetzungen:
- Praktikum Allgemeine Chemie (1. Semester, 529-0011-04/05)
- Vorlesung Organische Chemie I (1. Semester, 529-0011-03)
4. Semester
Compulsory Subjects Examination Block I
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0122-00LInorganic Chemistry IIO3 credits3GM. Kovalenko, M. L. Viciu
AbstractThe lecture is based on Inorganic Chemistry I and addresses an enhanced understanding of the symmetry aspects of chemical bonding of molecules and translation polymers, i.e. crystal structures.
ObjectiveThe lecture is based on Inorganic Chemistry I and addresses an enhanced understanding of the symmetry aspects of chemical bonding of molecules and translation polymers.
ContentSymmetry aspects of chemical bonding, point groups and representations for the deduction of molecular orbitals, energy assessment for molecules and solids, Sanderson formalism, derivation and understanding of band structures, densities of states, overlap populations, crystal symmetry, basic crystal structures and corresponding properties, visual representations of crystal structures.
Lecture notesAdditional information is available on the internet at:
http://www.ac.ethz.ch/
user: aach
password: jsenpw
Literature1. I. Hargittai, M. Hargittai, "Symmetry through the Eyes of a Chemist", Plenum Press, 1995;
2. R. Hoffmann, "Solids and Surfaces", VCH 1988;
3. U. Müller, "Anorganische Strukturchemie", 6. Auflage, Vieweg + Teubner 2008
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: Inorganic Chemistry I
529-0222-00LOrganic Chemistry IIO3 credits2V + 1UJ. W. Bode
AbstractOxidation of organic compounds; reductions; one electron transfer reactions; pericyclic reactions; cycloadditions; sigmatropic rearrangements; sextett rearrangements and related reactions; organometallic chemistry; application of the reactions in natural product synthesis
ObjectiveIn this course the major classes of organic transformations will be discussed and illustrated with pertinent examples. Oxidation and reduction reactions will be covered in the first part of the course and this will be followed by a survey of one-electron tranfer processes. The structure and reactivity of nitrenes and carbenes (reactive intermediates) will be described in the second section of the course. Pericyclic reactions will be covered in part three of the course and students will given an overview of preparative organometallic chemistry. The final section of the course includes and introduction to complex molecule synthesis and retrosynthetic analysis.
ContentThe Woodward-Hoffmann rules, electrocyclic reactions, sigmatropic rearrangements, cycloaddition reactions with detailed focus on the Diels-Alder reaction and 1,3 dipolar cycloadditions, oxidation and reduction, dissolving metal reductions, radical reactions, photochemical reactions, introduction to organometallic chemistry.
Lecture notesKeine; es wird erwartet, dass die Studenten den in der Vorlesung behandelten Stoff kennen und mit den gelehrten Prinzipien und Grundlagen umgehen können.
LiteratureKeine; es wird erwartet, dass die Studenten den in der Vorlesung behandelten Stoff kennen und mit den gelehrten Prinzipien und Grundlagen umgehen können.
529-0431-00LPhysical Chemistry III: Molecular Quantum Mechanics Restricted registration - show details O4 credits4GB. H. Meier, M. Ernst
AbstractPostulates of quantum mechanics, operator algebra, Schrödinger's equation, state functions and expectation values, matrix representation of operators, particle in a box, tunneling, harmonic oscillator, molecular vibrations, angular momentum and spin, generalised Pauli principle, perturbation theory, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, Born-Oppenheimer approximation.
ObjectiveThis is an introductory course in quantum mechanics. The course starts with an overview of the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics and introduces the mathematical formalism. The postulates and theorems of quantum mechanics are discussed in the context of experimental and numerical determination of physical quantities. The course develops the tools necessary for the understanding and calculation of elementary quantum phenomena in atoms and molecules.
ContentPostulates and theorems of quantum mechanics: operator algebra, Schrödinger's equation, state functions and expectation values. Linear motions: free particles, particle in a box, quantum mechanical tunneling, the harmonic oscillator and molecular vibrations. Angular momentum: electronic spin and orbital motion, molecular rotations. Electronic structure of atoms and molecules: the Pauli principle, angular momentum coupling, the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Variational principle and perturbation theory. Discussion of bigger systems (solids, nano-structures).
Lecture notesA script written in German will be distributed. The script is, however, no replacement for personal notes during the lecture and does not cover all aspects discussed.
402-0044-00LPhysics IIO4 credits3V + 1UM. R. Meyer
AbstractIntroduction to the concepts and tools in physics with the help of demonstration experiments: electromagnetism, optics, introduction to modern physics.
ObjectiveThe concepts and tools in physics, as well as the methods of an experimental science are taught. The student should learn to identify, communicate and solve physical problems in his/her own field of science.
ContentElectromagnetism (electric current, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations), Optics (light, geometrical optics, interference and diffraction), and Introduction to quantum physics
Lecture notesThe lecture follows the book "Physics for Scientists and Engineers" by Paul A. Tipler and Gene Mosca (6th edition).
LiteraturePhysics for Scientists and Engineers" by Paul A. Tipler and Gene Mosca (6th edition). There is also a similar book in German published by Spektrum Akademischer Verlag authored under the permission of Tipler and Mosca.
Prerequisites / NoticeFor the exam, a self-written summary sheet, hand-held calculator, and translation dictionary (to English).
529-0058-00LAnalytical Chemistry IIO3 credits3GD. Günther, M.‑O. Ebert, P. Lienemann, R. J. Looser, G. Schwarz
AbstractEnhanced knowledge about the elemental analysis and spectrocopical techniques with close relation to practical applications. This course is based on the knowledge from analytical chemistry I. Separation methods are included.
ObjectiveUse and applications of the elemental analysis and spectroscopical knowledge to solve relevant analytical problems.
ContentCombined application of spectroscopic methods for structure determination, and practical application of element analysis. More complex NMR methods: recording techniques, application of exchange phenomena, double resonance, spin-lattice relaxation, nuclear Overhauser effect, applications of experimental 2d and multipulse NMR spectroscopy, shift reagents. Application of chromatographic and electrophoretic separation methods: basics, working technique, quality assessment of a separation method, van-Deemter equation, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography (HPLC, ion chromatography, gel permeation, packing materials, gradient elution, retention index), electrophoresis, electroosmotic flow, zone electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, isoelectrical focussing, electrochromatography, 2d gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE, field flow fractionation, enhanced knowledge in atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, ICP-OES, ICP-MS.
Lecture notesScript will be available
LiteratureLiterature will be within the script
Prerequisites / NoticeExercises for spectra interpretation are part of the lecture. In addition the lecture 529-0289-00 "Instrumentalanalyse organischer Verbindungen" (4th semester) is recommended.
Prerequisite: 529-0051-00 "Analytische Chemie I" (3rd semester)
529-0625-00LChemical EngineeringO3 credits3GW. J. Stark
AbstractChemical Engineering provides an introduction to production and process design. Beyond different types and operation of chemical or bio-reactors, issues of scaling, new synthesis methods and problems of industrial production are addressed. An introduction in heterogeneous catalysis and transport of impulse, mass and energy connect the new concepts to the basic education in chemistry and biology.
ObjectiveIntended for chemists, chemical engineers, biochemists and biologists, the course Chemical and Bioengineering 4th semester addresses the basics of production and process design. Starting with different reactors, process steps and unit operations in production, the industrial scale usage of chemicals and reagents are discussed and further illustrated by examples. Material and energy balances and the concept of selectivity are used to broaden the students view on the complexity of production and show how modern engineering can contribute to an environmentally sustainable production. In the second part of the lecture, reactors, single cells or living matter are discussed in terms of transport properties. Beyond metabolism or chemical processes, transport of impulse, mass and energy heavily influence chemical and biological processes. They are introduced simultaneously and provide a basis for the understanding of flow, diffusion and heat transport. Dimensionless numbers are used to implement transport properties in unit operations and process design. An introduction to heterogeneous catalysis connects the acquired concepts to chemistry and biology and shows how powerful new processes arise from combining molecular understanding and transport.
ContentElements of chemical transformations: preparation of reactants, reaction process, product work-up and recycling, product purification; continuous, semibatch and batch processes; material balances: chemical reactors and separation processes, multiple systems and multistage systems; energy balances: chemical reactors and separation processes, enthalpy changes, coupled material and energy balances; multiple reactions: optimisation of reactor performance, yield and selectivity; mass transport and chemical reaction: mixing effects in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, diffusion and reaction in porous materials; heat exchange and chemical reaction: adiabatic reactors, optimum operating conditions for exothermic and endothermic equilibrium reactions, thermal runaway, reactor size and scale up.
Lecture notesSupporting material to the course is available on the homepage www.fml.ethz.ch
LiteratureLiterature and text books are announced at the beginning of the course.
Laboratory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0054-00LPhysical and Analytical ChemistryO10 credits15PE. C. Meister, R. Zenobi, M. Badertscher, M.‑O. Ebert, B. Hattendorf
AbstractPractical introduction to important experimental methods in physical and analytical chemistry.
ObjectiveThe students have to carry out selected experiments in physical chemistry and to evaluate measurement data.
They acquire a good knowledge about the most important practical techniques in analytical chemistry.
Laboratory reports have to be written to each experiment.
ContentPhysical chemistry part:
Short recapitulation of statistics and analysis of measurement data. Writing experimental reports with regard to publication of scientific works. Basic physical chemistry experiments (a maximum of six experiments form the following themes): 1. Phase diagrams (liquid-vapour and solid-liquid phase diagrams, cryoscopy); 2. electrochemistry and electronics; 3. data acquisition (LabVIEW); 4. kinetics; 5. thermochemistry; 6. speed of sound in gases.

Analytical chemistry part:
1. Introduction to the concept of sampling, quantitative elemental analysis and trace analysis, atomic spectroscopic methods, comparative measurements with electrochemical methods; 2. Separation methods, their principles and optimisation: comparison of the different chromatographic methods, effect of the stationary and mobile phases, common errors/artefacts, liquid chromatography, gas chromatography (injection methods). 3. Spectroscopic methods in organic structure determination: recording of IR and UV/VIS spectra, recording technique in NMR

Mandatory exercises in spectroscopy in an accompanying tutorial 529-0289-00 "Instrumentalanalyse organischer Verbindungen" are an integral part of this course.
Lecture notesDescritptions for experiments available on line.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
529-0051-00 "Analytische Chemie I (3. Semester)"
529-0058-00 "Analytische Chemie II (4. Semester)" in parallel to the lab class, or completed in an earlier semester. The course 529-0289-00L "Instumentalanalyse organischer Verbindungen" is an obligatory component of the lab class / praktikum.
6. Semester
Compulsory Subjects
Examination Block Catalysis and Heterogeneous Process Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0502-00LCatalysisO4 credits3GJ. A. van Bokhoven, M. Ranocchiari
AbstractFundamental principles of adsorption and catalysis, physics and chemistry of solid-state surfaces and methods for determining their structure and composition. Homogeneous catalysis with transition-metal complexes.
ObjectiveBasic knowledge of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis
ContentFundamental principles of adsorption and catalysis, physics and chemistry of solid-state surfaces and methods for determining their structure and composition, thermodynamic and kinetic fundamentals of heterogeneous catalysis (physisorption, chemisorption, kinetic modelling, selectivity, activity, stability), catalyst development and manufacture, homogeneous catalysis with transition-metal complexes; catalytic reaction cycles and types.
Lecture notesA script is available
LiteratureJ.M. Thomas and W.J. Thomas, Heterogeneous Catalysis, VCH, 1997

Homogeneous Catalysis
Basics:
R. H. Crabtree, The Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Metals, Wiley, 2009

Industrial Processes:
G. P. Chiusoli, P. M. Maitlis, Metal-catalysis in Industrial Organic Processes, RSC Publishing, 2008

Online:
Catalysis - An Integrated Approach to Homogeneous, Heterogeneous and Industrial Catalysis
Edited by: J.A. Moulijn, P.W.N.M. van Leeuwen and R.A. van Santen

Basic Coordination Chemistry:
J. Huheey, E. Keiter, R. Keiter, Anorganische Chemie - Prinzipien von Struktur und Reaktivität, de Gruyter
529-0633-00LHeterogeneous Reaction EngineeringO4 credits3GJ. Pérez-Ramírez, C. Mondelli
AbstractHeterogeneous Reaction Engineering equips students with tools essential for the optimal development of heterogeneous processes. Integrating concepts from chemical engineering and chemistry, students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of heterogeneous reactions and will develop the necessary skills for the selection and design of various types of idealized reactors.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course the students will understand the basic principles of catalyzed and uncatalyzed heterogeneous reactions. They will know models to represent fluid-fluid and fluid-solid reactions; how to describe the kinetics of surface reactions; how to evaluate mass and heat transfer phenomena and account for their impact on catalyst effectiveness; the principle causes of catalyst deactivation; and reactor systems and protocols for catalyst testing.
ContentThe following components are covered:
- Fluid-fluid and fluid-solid heterogeneous reactions.
- Kinetics of surface reactions.
- Mass and heat transport phenomena.
- Catalyst effectiveness.
- Catalyst deactivation.
- Strategies for catalyst testing.

These aspects are exemplified through modern examples.
For each core topic exercises are assigned and evaluated.
The course also features an industrial lecture.
Lecture notesA dedicated script and lecture slides are available in printed form during the course.
LiteratureH. Scott Fogler: Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1992

O. Levenspiel: Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd edition, John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey, 1999

Further relevant sources are given during the course.
151-0926-00LSeparation Process Technology I Information O4 credits3GM. Mazzotti
AbstractNon-empirical design of gas-liquid, vapor-liquid, and liquid-liquid separation processes for ideal and non-ideal systems, based on mass transfer phenomena and phase equilibrium.
ObjectiveNon-empirical design of gas-liquid, vapor-liquid, and liquid-liquid separation processes for ideal and non-ideal systems, based on mass transfer phenomena and phase equilibrium.
ContentMethods for the non empirical design of equilibrium stage separations for ideal and non-ideal systems, based on mass transfer phenomena and phase equilibrium. Topics: introduction to the separation process technology. Phase equilibrium: vapor/liquid and liquid/liquid. Flash vaporization: binary and multicomponent. Equilibrium stages and multistage cascades. Gas absorption and stripping. Continuous distillation: design methods for binary and multicomponent systems; continuous-contact equipment; azeotropic distillation, equipment for gas-liquid operations. Liquid/liquid extraction. The lecture is supported by a web base learning tool, i.e. HyperTVT.
Lecture notesLecture notes available
LiteratureTreybal "Mass-transfer operations" oder Seader/Henley "Separation process principles" oder Wankat "Equilibrium stage separations" oder Weiss/Militzer/Gramlich "Thermische Verfahrenstechnik"
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Stoffaustausch

A self-learning web-based environment is available (HyperTVT):
http://www.spl.ethz.ch/
Examination Block Process Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0580-00LRisk Analysis of Chemical Processes and ProductsO4 credits3GK. Hungerbühler
AbstractScientific methods for characterization of risks and environmental impacts of chemicals.
ObjectiveBasic understanding for methodology of Process Risk Analysis, Product Risk Analysis and Life Cycle Assessment.
ContentCentral to this lecture is the characterization of risks and environmental impacts of chemicals (from both production and application) by means of Process- and Product Risk Analysis as well as Life Cycle Assessment. Emphasis is put on scientific methods and their problem-oriented application in the field of chemical process and product technology.
Contents: Qualitative and quantitative methods of risk characterization by means of modeling and by comparison of (1) probability and consequences (short-term scenarios) and (2) exposure and does-effect relationship (long-term scenarios); use of molecular structure and physicochemical substance properties as descriptiors of substance-specific hazard indicators regarding mobility, persistence, toxicity, fire/explosion, etc.; derivation of conceptual design criteria for inherent safety and eco-efficiency in chemical process and product systems; sensitivity and uncertainty analysis
LiteratureBook: Hungerbühler, Ranke, Mettier
"Chemische Produkte und Prozesse - Grundkonzepte zum umweltorientierten Design"

Springer Verlag
ISBN 3-540-64854-2
Prerequisites / NoticeAccompanied by industry case study (group work)
529-0031-00LChemical Process Control Information O3 credits3GR. Grass
AbstractConcept of control. Modelling of dynamic systems. State space description, linearisation. Laplace transform, system response. Closed loop control - idea of feedback. PID control. Stability, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, frequency response, Bode diagram. Feedforward compensation, cascade control. Multivariable systems. Application to reactor control.
ObjectiveChemical Process Control. Process automation, concept of control. Modelling of dynamical systems - examples. State space description, linearisation, analytical/numerical solution.
Laplace transform, system response for first and second order systems. Closed loop control - idea of feedback. PID control, Ziegler - Nichols tuning. Stability, Routh-Hurwitz criteria, root locus, frequency response, Bode diagram, Nyquist criterion. Feedforward compensation, cascade control. Multivariable systems (transfer matrix, state space representation), multi-loop control, problem of coupling, Relative Gain Array, decoupling, sensitivity to model uncertainty. Applications to distillation and reactor control.
ContentProcess automation, concept of control. Modelling of dynamical systems with examples. State space description, linearisation, analytical/numerical solution. Laplace transform, system response for first and second order systems. Closed loop control - idea of feedback. PID control, Ziegler - Nichols tuning. Stability, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, frequency response, Bode diagram. Feedforward compensation, cascade control. Multivariable systems (transfer matrix, state space representation), multi-loop control, problem of coupling, Relative Gain Array, decoupling, sensitivity to model uncertainty. Applications to distillation and reactor control.
Lecture notesLink
Literature- "Feedback Control of Dynamical Systems", 4th Edition, by G.F. Franklin, J.D. Powell and A. Emami-Naeini; Prentice Hall, 2002.
- "Process Dynamics & Control", by D.E. Seborg, T.F. Edgar and D.A. Mellichamp; Wiley 1989.
- "Process Dynamics, Modelling & Control", by B.A. Ogunnaike and W.H. Ray;
Oxford University Press 1994.
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis II , linear algebra.

MATLAB is used extensively for system analysis and simulation.
151-0940-00LModelling and Mathematical Methods in Process and Chemical Engineering Information O4 credits3GM. Mazzotti
AbstractStudy of the non-numerical solution of systems of ordinary differential equations and first order partial differential equations, with application to chemical kinetics, simple batch distillation, and chromatography.
ObjectiveStudy of the non-numerical solution of systems of ordinary differential equations and first order partial differential equations, with application to chemical kinetics, simple batch distillation, and chromatography.
ContentDevelopment of mathematical models in process and chemical engineering, particularly for chemical kinetics, batch distillation, and chromatography. Study of systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), their stability, and their qualitative analysis. Study of single first order partial differential equation (PDE) in space and time, using the method of characteristics. Application of the theory of ODEs to population dynamics, chemical kinetics (Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction), and simple batch distillation (residue curve maps). Application of the method of characteristic to chromatography.
Lecture notesno skript
LiteratureA. Varma, M. Morbidelli, "Mathematical methods in chemical engineering," Oxford University Press (1997)
H.K. Rhee, R. Aris, N.R. Amundson, "First-order partial differential equations. Vol. 1," Dover Publications, New York (1986)
R. Aris, "Mathematical modeling: A chemical engineer’s perspective," Academic Press, San Diego (1999)
  •  Page  1  of  2 Next page Last page     All