Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Science, Technology, and Policy Master Information
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0585-38LData Science in Techno-Socio-Economic Systems Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 80

This course is thought be for students in the 5th semester or above with quantitative skills and interests in modeling and computer simulations.

Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D-MTEC, D-PHYS
W3 credits3SN. Antulov-Fantulin
AbstractThis course introduces how techno-socio-economic systems in our complex society can be better understood with techniques and tools of data science. Students shall learn how the fundamentals of data science are used to give insights into the research of complexity science, computational social science, economics, finance, and others.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to qualify students with knowledge on data science to better understand techno-socio-economic systems in our complex societies. This course aims to make students capable of applying the most appropriate and effective techniques of data science under different application scenarios. The course aims to engage students in exciting state-of-the-art scientific tools, methods and techniques of data science.
In particular, lectures will be divided into research talks and tutorials. The course shall increase the awareness level of students of the importance of interdisciplinary research. Finally, students have the opportunity to develop their own data science skills based on a data challenge task, they have to solve, deliver and present at the end of the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeGood programming skills and a good understanding of probability & statistics and calculus are expected.
102-0488-00LWater Resources ManagementW3 credits2GP. Burlando
AbstractModern engineering approach to problems of sustainable water resources, planning and management of water allocation requires the understanding of modelling techniques that allow to account for comprehensive water uses (thereby including ecological needs) and stakeholders needs, long-term analysis and optimization. The course presents the most relevant approaches to address these problems.
ObjectiveThe course provides the essential knowledge and tools of water resources planning and management. Core of the course are the concepts of data analysis, simulation, optimization and reliability assessment in relation to water projects and sustainable water resources management.
ContentThe course is organized in four parts.
Part 1 is a general introduction to the purposes and aims of sustainable water resources management, problem understanding and tools identification.
Part 2 recalls Time Series Analysis and Linear Stochastic Models. An introduction to Nonlinear Time Series Analysis and related techniques will then be made in order to broaden the vision of how determinism and stochasticity might sign hydrological and geophysical variables.
Part 3 deals with the optimal allocation of water resources and introduces to several tools traditionally used in WRM, such as linear and dynamic programming. Special attention will be devoted to optimization (deterministic and stochastic) and compared to simulation techniques as design methods for allocation of water resources in complex and competitive systems, with focus on sustainability and stakeholders needs.
Part 4 will introduce to basic indexes used in economical and reliability analyses, and will focus on multicriteria analysis methods as a tool to assess the reliability of water systems in relation to design alternatives.
Lecture notesA copy of the lecture handouts will be available on the webpage of the course. Complementary documentation in the form of scientific and technical articles, as well as excerpts from books will be also made available.
LiteratureA number of book chapters and paper articles will be listed and suggested to read. They will also be part of discussion during the oral examination.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuggested relevant courses: Hydrologie I (or a similar content course) and Wasserhaushalt (Teil "Wasserwirtschaft", 4. Sem. UmweltIng., or a similar content course) for those students not belonging to Environmental Engineering.
118-0112-00LParticipatory and Integrated Water Resources Planning Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.

The course is complementary to "Water Resources Management" (102-0488-00L).
W3 credits4VA. Castelletti
AbstractThe course develops basic knowledge and skills for modelling, planning and managing water resources systems in a balanced and sustainable way. The emphasis will be on the operational aspects of water management, including: introduction to participatory decision-making, modelling of the multiple stakes and socio-economic processes, introduction to dynamic and stochastic optimization approaches.
ObjectiveThe course aims at illustrating the complex framework of participatory approach in the field of water resources projects, with particular focus on the modelling of the quantitative aspects of the combined dynamics of the physical and socio-economic processes.
ContentLec 00. Course introduction. The world water resources. Water crisis and the concept of Participatory and Integrated Water Resources Management (PIWRM). Water trading.

Lec 01. Rationalizing the decision-making process. From traditional water resources planning and management to PIWRM: rationalizing and supporting the decision-making process. The need for negotiations. Negotiation game.
Outline of the Participatory and Integrated Planning procedure proposed as a guidance to the decision-making process using a real world case study.

Lec 02. Cloosing the loop: how to plan the management. How to incorporate recurrent management decisions into a rational decision-making framework. From model based decision-making to decision support systems. Full-rationality and partial-rationality. Underlying example the Zambezi river system.

Lec 03. Actions and evaluation criteria. Identification of the actions suitable to pursue the overall objective of the planning exercise. Type of actions and associated property. Embedding actions into models. Stakeholders, sectors and evaluation criteria: how stakeholders evaluate the planning alternatives. Criterion hierarchy and indicators: operationalize evaluation criteria.

Lec 04. Criteria and indicators. Example of indicators. Validation of the indicators against the stakeholders. Numerical exercise. Underlying examples from Red River System (Vietnam), Tono dam (Japan), Googong reservoir (Australia), Lake Maggiore and Lake Como (Italy).

Lec 05. Re-operating the Kafue reservoir system. Real world case study developed interactively with the students, to experience all the concepts provided in the previous lectures. Reading material will be assigned on 22.3

Lec 06. Models of a water system. The system analysis perspective on water resources modelling. Example of models of water system components (reservoir, diversion dam, rivers, users). Implications of cooperation and information sharing on the model formulation. Operational implications of model complexity. Case studies.

Lec 07. Formulation of the planning/management problem. Why we need it. What do we need to formulate the problem: from the indicators to the objectives; time horizon; scenarios. Dealing with uncertainty. Problem formulation and classification. How do modelling choices affect the final solution (hidden subjectivity).

Lec 08. Water resources optimal planning. The planning of water resources. Examples from real world problems at different scales (e.g. Egypt Water plan; Controlling salt intrusion in Nauru (Pacific Island); planning water quality remediation interventions in lakes and reservoirs (Googong reservoir, Australia)). Interactive lectures with students. Overview of the different approaches available to resolve the problem, from exact solution to heuristic.

Lec 09. Planning the New Valley water system in Egypt. Real world case study developed interactively with the student, to experience all the concepts provided in the previous lectures.

Lec 10. Planning in non stationary conditions: the Red River (Vietnam). Real world case study developed interactively with the student, to experience all the concepts provided in the previous lectures.
Lecture notesCourse lectures are almost fully covered by the following two textbooks accordingly to the indications provided at the end of each lecture:

R. Soncini-Sessa, A. Castelletti, and E. Weber, 2007. Integrated and participatory water resources management. Theory. Elsevier, The Netherlands.

R. Soncini-Sessa, F. Cellina, F. Pianosi, and E. Weber, 2007. Integrated and participatory water resources management. Practice. Elsevier, The Netherlands.
LiteratureAdditional readings:
S.P. Simonovic, 2009. Managing water resources: Methods and tools for a systems approach, Earthscan, London.
D.P. Loucks, E. van Beek, 2005. Water Resources Systems Planning and Management: An Introduction to Methods, Models and Applications, UNESCO, Paris.
K.D.W. Nandalal, J. Bogardi, 2007. Dynamic Programming Based Operation of Reservoirs, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Prerequisites / NoticeLecture notes, slides and other material will be posted on the course web page the day before each lecture.
351-0778-00LDiscovering Management
Entry level course in management for BSc, MSc and PHD students at all levels not belonging to D-MTEC.
This course can be complemented with Discovering Management (Excercises) 351-0778-01L.
W3 credits3GL. De Cuyper, S. Brusoni, B. Clarysse, S. Feuerriegel, V. Hoffmann, T. Netland, G. von Krogh
AbstractDiscovering Management offers an introduction to the field of business management and entrepreneurship for engineers and natural scientists. The module provides an overview of the principles of management, teaches knowledge about management that is highly complementary to the students' technical knowledge, and provides a basis for advancing the knowledge of the various subjects offered at D-MTEC.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to introduce the students to the relevant topics of the management literature and give them a good introduction in entrepreneurship topics too. The course is a series of lectures on the topics of strategy, innovation, marketing, corporate social responsibility, and productions and operations management. These different lectures provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations of management. In addition, students are required to work in teams on a project. The purpose of this project is to analyse the innovative needs of a large multinational company and develop a business case for the company to grow.
ContentDiscovering Management aims to broaden the students' understanding of the principles of business management, emphasizing the interdependence of various topics in the development and management of a firm. The lectures introduce students not only to topics relevant for managing large corporations, but also touch upon the different aspects of starting up your own venture. The lectures will be presented by the respective area specialists at D-MTEC.
The course broadens the view and understanding of technology by linking it with its commercial applications and with society. The lectures are designed to introduce students to topics related to strategy, corporate innovation, corporate social responsibility, and business model innovation. Practical examples from industry will stimulate the students to critically assess these issues.
Prerequisites / NoticeDiscovering Management is designed to suit the needs and expectations of Bachelor students at all levels as well as Master and PhD students not belonging to D-MTEC. By providing an overview of Business Management, this course is an ideal enrichment of the standard curriculum at ETH Zurich.
No prior knowledge of business or economics is required to successfully complete this course.
351-0778-01LDiscovering Management (Exercises)
Complementary exercises for the module Discovering Managment.

Prerequisite: Participation and successful completion of the module Discovering Management (351-0778-00L) is mandatory.
W1 credit1UB. Clarysse
AbstractThis course is offered complementary to the basis course 351-0778-00L, "Discovering Management". The course offers an additional exercise in the form of a project conducted in team.
ObjectiveThis course is offered to complement the course 351-0778-00L. The course offers an additional exercise to the more theoretical and conceptual content of Discovering Management.

While Discovering Management offers an introduction to various management topics, in this course, creative skills will be trained by the business game exercise. It is a participant-centered, team-based learning activity, which provides students with the opportunity to place themselves in the role of Chief Innovation Officer of a large multinational company.
ContentAs the students learn more about the specific case and identify the challenge they are faced with, they will have to develop an innovative business case for this multinational corporation. Doing so, this exercise will provide an insight into the context of managerial problem-solving and corporate innovation, and enhance the students' appreciation for the complex tasks companies and managers deal with. The exercise presents a realistic model of a company and provides a valuable learning platform to integrate the increasingly important development of the skills and competences required to identify entrepreneurial opportunities, analyse the future business environment and successfully respond to it by taking systematic decisions, e.g. critical assessment of technological possibilities.
101-0588-01LRe-/Source the Built EnvironmentW3 credits2SG. Habert
AbstractThe course focuses on material choice and energy strategies to limit the environmental impact of construction sector. During the course, specific topics will be presented (construction technologies, environmental policies, social consequences of material use, etc.). The course aims to present sustainable options to tackle the global challenge we are facing and show that "it is not too late".
ObjectiveAfter the lecture series, the students are aware of the main challenges for the production and use of building materials.

They know the different technologies/propositions available, and environmental consequence of a choice.

They understand in which conditions/context one resource/technology will be more appropriate than another
ContentA general presentation of the global context allows to identify the objectives that as engineer, material scientist or architect needs to achieve to create a sustainable built environment.

The course is then conducted as a serie of guest lectures focusing on one specific aspect to tackle this global challenge and show that "it is not too late".

The lecture series is divided as follows:
- General presentation
- Notion of resource depletion, resilience, criticality, decoupling, etc.
- Guest lectures covering different resources and proposing different option to build or maintain a sustainable built environment.
Lecture notesFor each lecture slides will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture series will be conducted in English and is aimed at students of master's programs, particularly the departments ARCH, BAUG, ITET, MAVT, MTEC and USYS.

No lecture will be given during Seminar week.
118-0111-00LSustainability and Water Resources Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 16.

Suitable for MSc and PhD students.
Automatic admittance is given to students of MAS Sustainable Water Resources. All other registrations accepted until capacity is reached.
W3 credits2GD. Molnar, P. Burlando
AbstractThe block course on Sustainability and Water Resources features invited experts from a range of disciplines, who present their experiences working with sustainability issues related to water resources. The students are exposed to many different perspectives, and learn how to critically evaluate sustainability issues with respect to water resources management.
ObjectiveThe course provides the students with background information on sustainability in relation to water resources within an international and multidisciplinary framework. The lectures challenge the students to consider sustainability and the importance of water availability and water scarcity in a changing world, at the same time preparing them to face the challenges of the future, e.g. climate and land use change, increased water use and population growth.
ContentThe course offers the students the opportunity to learn about sustainability and water resources in a multi-disciplinary fashion, with a focus on case studies from around the world. Selected topics include: Sustainability Issues in Water Resources, the EU Water Framework Directive, Mining in Latin America, Environmental Flows, and Water Quality Issues. Group exercises, which encourage debate and discussion, are an important component of the course. For more information, please visit Link
Prerequisites / NoticeFor further information, contact the MAS coordinator, Darcy Molnar (darcy.molnar@ifu.baug.ethz.ch)
118-0113-00LWater Governance: Challenges and Solutions Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants is limited to 16.

Suitable for MSc and PhD Students. Automatic admittance is given to students of the MAS in Sustainable Water Resources. All other registrations are accepted until capacity is reached.
W1 credit2GP. Burlando, D. Molnar
AbstractThe block course on "Water Governance: Challenges and Solutions" features invited experts with backgrounds in international relations, law, politics, and diplomacy. Through theoretical input and case studies, students learn about the realities of water conflicts and the intricacies of cooperation and diplomacy.
ObjectiveThe course provides students with insights into the complex realities of addressing water conflicts with sustainable solutions that promote cooperation.
ContentThe course offers students the opportunity to learn from experts who have worked on domestic and transboundary river basin issues, both in Europe and internationally. Through case studies and group exercises, students gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of water governance and current global challenges. Topics that will be addressed include stakeholder involvement, institutional legal frameworks, and solutions for cooperation.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse details at:https://mas-swr.ethz.ch/curriculum/courses/core-courses/water-governance-challenges-solutions.html

For further information, contact the MAS coordinator, Darcy Molnar (darcy.molnar@ifu.baug.ethz.ch)
860-0024-00LDigital Society: Ethical, Societal and Economic Challenges Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants is limited to 35
W3 credits2VM. M. Dapp
AbstractThis seminar will address ethical challenges coming along with new digital technologies such as cloud computing, Big Data, artificial
intelligence, cognitive computing, quantum computing, robots, drones, Internet of Things, virtual reality, blockchain technology, and more...
ObjectiveParticipants shall learn to understand that any technology implies not only opportunities, but also risks, and that it is important to
understand these well in order to minimize the risks and maximize the benefits. In some cases, it is highly non-trivial to identify and
avoid undesired side effects of technologies. The seminar will sharpen the attention how to design technologies for values,
also called value-sensitive design or ethically aligned design.
LiteratureWill be provided on a complementary website of the course. Complementary literature should be searched and evaluated by the students
themselves.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo earn credit points, students will have to read the relevant literature on one of the above technologies and give a
presentation about the ethical implications. Both, potential problems and possible solutions shall be carefully discussed.
860-0022-00LComplexity and Global Systems Science Information Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 64.

Prerequisites: solid mathematical skills.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET, D-MAVT and ISTP
W3 credits2VD. Helbing
AbstractThis course discusses complex techno-socio-economic systems, their counter-intuitive behaviors, and how their theoretical understanding empowers us to solve some long-standing problems that are currently bothering the world.
ObjectiveParticipants should learn to get an overview of the state of the art in the field, to present it in a well understandable way to an interdisciplinary scientific audience, to develop models for open problems, to analyze them, and to defend their results in response to critical questions. In essence, participants should improve their scientific skills and learn to think scientifically about complex dynamical systems.
ContentThis course starts with a discussion of the typical and often counter-intuitive features of complex dynamical systems such as self-organization, emergence, (sudden) phase transitions at "tipping points", multi-stability, systemic instability, deterministic chaos, and turbulence. It then discusses phenomena in networked systems such as feedback, side and cascade effects, and the problem of radical uncertainty. The course progresses by demonstrating the relevance of these properties for understanding societal and, at times, global-scale problems such as traffic jams, crowd disasters, breakdowns of cooperation, crime, conflict, social unrests, political revolutions, bubbles and crashes in financial markets, epidemic spreading, and/or "tragedies of the commons" such as environmental exploitation, overfishing, or climate change. Based on this understanding, the course points to possible ways of mitigating techno-socio-economic-environmental problems, and what data science may contribute to their solution.
Prerequisites / NoticeMathematical skills can be helpful
052-0708-00LUrban Design IV Information W2 credits2VH. Klumpner, S. V. Baur
AbstractThe ‘Urban Stories’ lecture series introduces a city during each lecture. The city’s urban development is described through contemporary phenomena and is critically presented as strategies and tactics. The urban phenomenon we explore in this course show urban conditions, models and operational modes.
ObjectiveHow can we read cities and recognize current trends and urban phenomena? The lectures series will produce a catalogue of operational urban tools as a series of critical case studies, and as basis for future practice. Urban Stories introduces a repertoire of urban design instruments to the students.
This will empower them to read cities and apply these tools in the urban environment. The course will approach the topic employing analytical cases on different scales, geographies, in diverse socio-political, ecological and economical environments. With our collection of tools compiled in a 'toolbox' in the logic of an evolving archive, we aim to tell the fundamental story of contemporary urban development. This specific analysis offers insight and knowledge that helps students to make informed design decisions. The tools are grouped in thematic clusters, compared, interpreted and via interviews annotated by local experts. This approach sensibilities the students to understand how to operate in different local but also international contexts.
ContentUrban form cannot be reduced to the physical space. Cities are the result of social construction, under the influence of technologies, ecology, culture, the impact of experts and accidents. Urban un-concluded processes respond to political interests, economic pressure, cultural inclinations, along with the imagination of architects and urbanists and the informal powers at work in complex adaptive systems. Current urban phenomena are the result of an urban evolution. The facts stored in urban environments include contributions from its entire lifecycle. That is true for the physical environment, but also for non-physical aspects, the imaginary city that exists along with its potentials and problems and with the conflicts that have evolved over time. Knowledge and understanding along with a critical observation of the actions and policies are necessary to understand the diversity and instability present in the contemporary city and to understand how urban form evolved to its current state.

How did cities develop into the cities we live in now? Which urban plans, instruments, visions, political decisions, economic reasonings, cultural inputs and social organisation have been used to operate in urban settlements in specific moments of change? We have chosen cities that are exemplary in illustrating how these instruments have been implemented and how they have shaped urban environments. We transcribe these instruments into urban operational tools that we have recognized and collected within existing tested cases in contemporary cities across the globe.

This lecture series will introduce urban knowledge and the way it has introduced urban models and operational modes within different concrete realities, therefore shaping cities. Urban knowledge will be translated into operational tools, extracted from cities where they have been tested and become exemplary samples, most relevant for providing a deeper insight of how urban landscape has taken shape. The tools are assembled in thematic clusters and scales for support comparability and cross-reflection.

Tool case studies are compiled into a toolbox, which we use as templates to read the city and to critically reflect upon it. Furthermore, in order to better understand the co-production of urban space and the interdependence of influencing factors, we have developed a frame of reference in the form of the triad PEOPLE (individual and collective stakeholders, lived and percieved space), PROGRAM (simple and complex instructions, representations and concepts of space use) and ENVIRONMENT (eco-geological, built and constructed space). This matrix is then applied to the various case studies and its tools in favor to arrive at a trans-disciplinary and multi-perspective approach that enables socially, ecologically and economically sustainable urban design.The presented contents are meant to serve as inspiration for positioning in future professional life as well as to provide instruments for future design decisions.

The lecture series is as well a preparation for design studio work and can be deepened and applied in the other teaching and research projects of the chair.

For further information: https://klumpner.arch.ethz.ch/
Lecture notesThe learning material, available via https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/ is comprised of:
- Toolbox 'Reader' with introduction to the lecture course and tool summaries
- Weekly exercise tasks
- Infographics with basic information of each city
- Quiz question for each tool
- Additional reading material
- Series of interviews with local experts of the different cities

The compiled learning material can be downloaded from the student-server.
LiteraturePlease see 'Skript'.
Prerequisites / Notice"Semesterkurs" (semester course) students from other departments or students taking this lecture as GESS / Studium Generale course as well as exchange students must submit a research paper, which will be subject to the performance assessment: "Bestanden" (pass) or "Nicht bestanden" (failed) as the performance assessment type, for "Urban Design I: Urban Stories" taken as a semester course, is categorized as "unbenotete Semesterleistung" (ungraded semester performance).
851-0586-02LThe Spectacles of MeasurementW3 credits2VU. Brandes
AbstractIf you can't measure it, you can't manage it. Explorations into mathematical foundations and societal implications of measuring humans, processes, and things in an increasingly datafied world.
ObjectiveStudents have a basic understanding of what makes a property quantifiable. They know the difference between operational and representational measurement, and the consequences this has for both, the collection of data and its use in decision making and control. With a critical attitude toward datafication, contextual differences are appreciated across domains such as science and engineering, health and sports, or governance and policy making.
ContentMeasurement Theory
- representations, scales
- meaningfulness
- direct vs. indirect, conjoint measurement

Measurement Practice
- units and standards
- sensors and intruments
- items and questionnaires

Measurement Politics
- administration and control, adaptation
- digitization, e-democracy, privacy
Lecture notesSlides made available in a course moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents pair up in teams to write an essay on a measurement problem they care about (such as one pertinent to their discipline or research).
860-0017-00LScience Communication Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 10.

STP Students have priority.
W6 credits3GA. Wenger, M. Dunn Cavelty, C. Elhardt
AbstractSuccessful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public is an essential skill at the intersection of science, technology and policy making. This course looks at the expectations and needs of different target groups and teaches “best practices” for different modes of communication via a variety of exercises.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to learn about science communication in theory and learn how to apply this knowledge in practice through different formats and media, aimed at different audiences.
ContentIn this course, we will analyze the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public. To get a better understanding of the expectations and needs of different target groups we will look at different formats and will also invite guest speakers from science communication jobs to share their experiences and discuss common problems. The final part of this course consists of practical applications and exercises. Proceeding in a 'draft/revise/submit'-manner, students will have to present a scientific project (possibly linked to a case study) in different formats (e.g. newspaper contribution and policy brief). Faculty will supervise the writing process and provide reviews and comments on drafts.
Lecture notesPapers are made available for the participants of this course through Moodle. The book used for the 2nd part of the course "Escape from the Ivory Tower" can be bought from the instructors
LiteraturePapers are made available for the participants of this course through Moodle. The book used for the 2nd part of the course "Escape from the Ivory Tower" can be bought from the instructors
Prerequisites / NoticeThe total number of students is 10. MSc students, PhD students and postdocs with a science and technology background have priority; weekly meetings of minimum 2, maximum 3 hours during FS (Spring Semester) 2017, 6 ETCS (approx. 39 contact hours + 141 hours for preparations and exercises); grading based on the exercises and final products (policy briefs, op eds) on a 1-6 point scale
860-0001-01LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes; Research Paper Restricted registration - show details
Only for MSc Science, Technology, and Policy.

Prerequisite: you have to be enrolled in 860-0001-00L during the same semester.
W3 credits3AT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThis is an add-on module to the course: 860-0001-00L. It focuses on students writing an essay on an issue covered by the main course 860-0001-00L.
ObjectiveStudents learn how to write an essay on a policy issue they select.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies - hence this course is complementary to the ISTP course on concepts and methods of policy analysis. Students learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (taught by Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (taught by Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (taught by Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organizations.
Lecture notesSee 860-0001-00L
LiteratureBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bernauer, T., Jahn, D., Kuhn, P., Walter, S. (2009, 2012): Einführung in die Politikwissenschaft (Introduction to Political Science). Baden-Baden: Nomos / UTB.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2nd edition 2017): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer, available as an ebook at ETH library.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.
Prerequisites / NoticeAccess only for ISTP MSc students also enrolled in 860-0001-00L
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